Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 4th Aug 2006 23:31 UTC, submitted by IdaAshley
Linux The LinuxThreads project originally brought multithreading to Linux, but didn't conform to POSIX threading standards. The introduction of Native POSIX Thread Library (NPTL) however, overcame many of these disadvantages. This article describes some of the differences between these two Linux threading models for developers who may need to port their applications or who simply want to understand where the differences lie.
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m:n
by Cloudy on Sun 6th Aug 2006 01:55 UTC
Cloudy
Member since:
2006-02-15

If userspace/kernelspace synchronization becomes a hassle with your m:n thread model, you need to fix the model, because it doesn't have to be.

A properly done m:n thread model is transparent to user space applications, has precisely the same performance as a 1:1 model for applications where m:n doesn't matter, and has better performance in those cases where it does.

The Cray m:n model in Unicos on the X/MP and Y/MP series is an existance proof of such an implementation.

Reply Score: 1

RE: m:n
by abraxas on Sun 6th Aug 2006 22:41 in reply to "m:n"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

A properly done m:n thread model is transparent to user space applications, has precisely the same performance as a 1:1 model for applications where m:n doesn't matter, and has better performance in those cases where it does.

If you can find or code an M:N threading model for Linux that outperforms NPTL I would love to see it. The inherent complexity just begs for bugs, and IMHO isn't worth the effort unless significant performance increases can be attained.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: m:n
by Cloudy on Mon 7th Aug 2006 06:10 in reply to "RE: m:n"
Cloudy Member since:
2006-02-15

If you can find or code an M:N threading model for Linux that outperforms NPTL I would love to see it. The inherent complexity just begs for bugs, and IMHO isn't worth the effort unless significant performance increases can be attained.

Tempting, but no, thanks. I'm not up to the up-hill battle it'd take to get Linus to change his mind.

Maybe next year at this time, after I finish my current embedded OS project.

Reply Parent Score: 1