Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Aug 2006 18:30 UTC
Apple At the 2006 WWDC in San Fransisco, Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced several new products during his opening keynote speech. Read more for a chronological summary of the keynote-- including the much-debated preview of Mac OS 10.5, Leopard, which, according to Steve Jobs, will ship this spring. Update: Apparantly, a similar feature to Time Machine already exists in Linux. It is called 'Dervish'.
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LOL
by cchance on Mon 7th Aug 2006 18:54 UTC
cchance
Member since:
2006-02-24

This was the biggest waste of time ive ever seen... there adding a bunch of old windows features with some polish on them... i mean give me a break the most interesting thing at the conference was the iChat backgrounds... i mean give me a break the mail now has themes for the messages... WOW go figure doesnt incredimale and even i believe outlook do that?

Time Machine... you mean like... previous versions in vista, xp , 2003 LOL

active desktop.. hmm never heard of that before
And ... Virtual Desktops... OH MY GOD could we go more old school thats so windows 95... microsoft later discovered that ...

more screens > more virtual screens

Reply Score: 1

RE: LOL
by Roguelazer on Mon 7th Aug 2006 19:06 in reply to "LOL "
Roguelazer Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually, Time Machine is nothing at all like System Restore. System Restore backs up the registry and certain Windows files (.exes and .dlls that are crucial to the system) and filesystem status at pseudo-random intervals. When you want to restore from System Restore, you need to restore the whole thing, which usually deletes most of the files created since the restore date, and screws up any programs you've installed since. Time Machine backs up every file, every time it changes, and is intended not so much to restore the system when you install Super Online Game and Spyware Program, but to restore your files when you accidencally delete them.

The new Dashboard feature is probably a little bit like Active Desktop, except not really. I won't comment too much.

Finally, as to Virtual Desktops, they've been supported on *nix window managers for a long, long, long time. Of course, they were not a stock feature on Windows 95, so I'm not sure exactly what you're talking about. OS X has also had better support for multiple screens than Windows has for a long time, with the playing field becoming level only with the release of Windows XP.

BTW, yes, I know you're a troll. Oh well.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: LOL
by n4cer on Mon 7th Aug 2006 19:24 in reply to "RE: LOL "
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Actually, Time Machine is nothing at all like System Restore.
...
Time Machine backs up every file, every time it changes, and is intended not so much to restore the system when you install Super Online Game and Spyware Program, but to restore your files when you accidencally delete them.


You're correct that this isn't like System Restore, but it is like volume shadow copy (Server 2003 and Vista) and CompletePC Backup (Vista).

VSC
http://blogs.technet.com/windowsvista/archive/2006/08/01/444439.asp...

CompletePC Backup
http://blogs.technet.com/aralves/archive/2006/07/10/440989.aspx

Edited 2006-08-07 19:29

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: LOL
by eschrock on Mon 7th Aug 2006 20:27 in reply to "RE: LOL "
eschrock Member since:
2005-07-07

Time Machine backs up every file, every time it changes, and is intended not so much to restore the system when you install Super Online Game and Spyware Program, but to restore your files when you accidencally delete them.

Not quite. From the time machine page:

http://www.apple.com/macosx/leopard/timemachine.html

Backup Time: Time Machine will back up every night at midnight, unless you select a different time from this menu.

So Time Machine is a standard sparse backup utility, with a very slick layered GUI. It doesn't back up files continuously, which would require a COW filesystem to be anywhere near feasible. Applications must use new APIs in order to access these alternate versions. Very nice GUI and integration work (which Apple is always good at), but the underlying filesystem technology is rather mundane.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: LOL
by BluenoseJake on Tue 8th Aug 2006 12:55 in reply to "RE: LOL "
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Actually, Time machine is very similar to the way System Restore works on Vista, as MS have added file versioning on the filesystem level:
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060730-7383.html

Reply Parent Score: 1