Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 11th Aug 2006 19:43 UTC, submitted by Saad
IBM "August 12, 1981 marks the birth of the IBM PC, the computer that single-handedly turned personal computing to the business market. IBM's success forced Apple and others to change their focus, and most personal computer companies from the pre-IBM era have become historical footnotes. By 2006, even Apple Computer had followed IBM's lead and adopted Intel CPUs and built Macs that can boot Microsoft Windows." Yes, boys and girls, she's that old. A 'thank you' is in order, I suppose.
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RE: Apple changed architectures
by Sabon on Fri 11th Aug 2006 20:37 UTC
Sabon
Member since:
2005-07-06

"By 2006, even Apple Computer had followed IBM's lead and adopted Intel CPUs and built Macs that can boot Microsoft Windows.""

The really funny thing is that Apple moved from IBM CPUs to Intel. Not even IBM uses their Power chips for their PCs. OK, they sold their PC business to Leveno (spelling?)

Reply Score: 1

butters Member since:
2005-07-08

IBM uses POWER chips in all System P and some System I servers. Starting in 2007, System I, P, and Z (midrange cross-platform, high-end UNIX, and mainframes) will all share a common processor architecture based on eClipz (POWER6). System X will continue to use Intel processors, and will begin using AMD processors, especially in the BladeCenter line.

The consumer PC market is low-ticket and low-margin, and the only reason to stay in this business is to build mindshare for your enterprise-class platforms. Part of the reason why IBM can afford to divest of its PC division is because of the growth of open standards and cross-platform software in the enterprise. The other justification is the focus on global business services as a sales tool.

For what it's worth (very little), Intel's flagship Woodcrest chips aren't exactly trouncing the G5, IBM's 3-year-old, stripped-down, single-core version of the POWER4. But it gives some perspective on how IBM and Apple are in two different markets and two different leagues.

Disclaimer: All information is public, not talking for IBM.

Reply Parent Score: 2

foobar Member since:
2006-02-07

"Starting in 2007, System I, P, and Z (midrange cross-platform, high-end UNIX, and mainframes) will all share a common processor architecture based on eClipz (POWER6)."

Watch it! Some people will read "common processor architecture" and jump to "AIX, zOS, and AS400 will be able to run on the same machine because there is only 1 processor. They're emulating the zArchitecture." There will be a z6 and a p6. They are 2 distinct processors with some shared logic outside of the pipeline! The design mantra is to share where it is practical.

Reply Parent Score: 3