Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 18th Aug 2006 12:19 UTC, submitted by Techie
Apple "The open source revolution has shaken the slowly crumbling foundations of closed source software, and while it hasn't taken over completely just yet, the tide is beginning to turn in its favor. Your normal everyday user may not really understand or appreciate what open source means, but that doesn't mean that they're not experiencing the effects of it."
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RE[5]: Totally baffled by this
by neowolf on Fri 18th Aug 2006 22:17 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Totally baffled by this"
neowolf
Member since:
2005-07-06

webkit = khtml
That's somewhat true, but at this point both projects have diverged in different directions quite a bit. Honestly I've found WebKit to have quite a few advantages over KHTML at this point, especially in the realm of compatibility. (Hence why there are projects on quite a few OSes now implementing their own browser based on WebKit.)

The downside being that while they ditched reliance on QT they still didn't make it THAT gentle to port. (Though I could be wrong after all of the ports done, I suspect some simplification may have made it's why into the source tree.) And it's coding style has changed dramatically from KHTML. Enough so that by and large the team there isn't interested in taking back from the source because they'd have to literally back port to account for Apple's structure and style changes. (Apparently Apple's devs don't meet their style guide lines in the least.)

From what I know launchd is indeed their own attempt at a process manager based in XML so that's an example of their own open project. As would be Rendezvous and the Quicktime streaming server last I checked. It's true, they haven't released that much of their own stuff to the masses but they've respected every open source license they've used and continue to try to encourage open projects relating to OS X. (Hell, OpenDarwin goes to shut down and they scramble to give the hosted projects a new home with MacForge!)

Reply Parent Score: 3

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

That's somewhat true, but at this point both projects have diverged in different directions quite a bit. Honestly I've found WebKit to have quite a few advantages over KHTML at this point, especially in the realm of compatibility. (Hence why there are projects on quite a few OSes now implementing their own browser based on WebKit.)

Actually, this is one area where Apple does seem to be backtracking and once again embracing a collaborative model.

Although WebKit diverged from KHTML, the unity project is bringing it back into the fold. WebKit has been ported to qt4 and will have KDE desktop integration applied, including a kpart. At least, that's my understanding of it all.

This is an experiment right now to determine the viability of re-merging fixes from KHTML into WebKit and possibly bringing the projects in synch. There's no plan as far as I know at this point to drop KHTML in KDE 4.0, but if all goes well the projects could be synched.

More importantly Apple is supporting this effort, so while the initial fork of WebKit from KHTML may not have been KDE's cup of tea, the end result could be an even more powerful engine supported with committed resources from Apple, KDE and Nokia.

If Apple plays nice and the kde devs can put aside their differences from the past, neither of which is an absolute given, there's a lot of benefit here for many people. This is one example, I think, of Apple realizing there is more to gain from working together openly rather than simply building upon.

Reply Parent Score: 1