Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 31st Aug 2006 01:09 UTC, submitted by Jeff
Gentoo Linuxlookup.com is reporting on the release of Gentoo Linux 2006.1. Building on the strengths of previous releases and featuring all of Gentoo's well-documented flexibility, performance and portability, this release is now available on all supported architectures. The most popular architectures now use GCC 4.1, glibc 2.4 and baselayout 1.12.1, as well as including a new profile layout, with seperate desktop and server profiles.
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Aww...
by 1c3d0g on Thu 31st Aug 2006 12:52 UTC
1c3d0g
Member since:
2005-07-06

...I just finished compiling KDE. :-(

In all seriousness, I wonder what a quad-core CPU would do to compile times. Maybe it'll make installing apps almost as fast as a binary install, thereby making Gentoo more attractive to a larger user base.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Aww...
by devrx on Thu 31st Aug 2006 13:00 in reply to "Aww..."
devrx Member since:
2005-10-31

Well, I run gentoo and use both a dual-core Opteron 165 @2.5GHz and an Athlon64 3200 to compile (using distcc to distribute the compiling over the machines). It's very fast at compiling, but still much slower than a binary install. Also, many packages have to be compiled with make -j1 (i.e. only one file is compiled at a time) because otherwise the build process breaks, so adding more cores doesn't help with them.

Having said that, the advantages of gentoo make up for the compile times for me.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Aww...
by Fusion on Thu 31st Aug 2006 13:16 in reply to "Aww..."
Fusion Member since:
2005-07-18

...I wonder what a quad-core CPU would do to compile times. Maybe it'll make installing apps almost as fast as a binary install, thereby making Gentoo more attractive to a larger user base...

We're running a quad core Xeon workstation with 4 gigs of RAM at work. (We do fMRI brain imaging analysis with the machine.) Gentoo is our primary OS for the workstation, and the stage1 install was not quick *at all.* =)

Compiling from source still takes a while no matter what powerhouse you've got... especially when you compile things like glibc and gcc more than once. And comparing binary install times with compile-install times on the same workstation will most likely always favor the binary (by leaps and bounds).

I still love Gentoo. Beyond the hype, it has a great community, excellent documentation, and it's empowering to users. I personally came for the optimizations, but I stayed for its package management system. Not only are dependencies not an issue, but I love that for each package you can selectively compile-in or opt-out of compiling-in support for other applications/frameworks. I don't know many other distros that make that so simple.

I love other distros, but gentoo definitely fills an important niche. And that niche, in many ways, is under appreciated. We're not all "ricers." To me, Gentoo makes freedom more accessible.

Reply Parent Score: 5