Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 2nd Sep 2006 19:43 UTC, submitted by Saad
Amiga & AROS The Amiga changed the computer industry. It was based on a multitasking operating system, rivaled the graphics power of some workstations and was affordable enough for home users. Unfortunately, Commodore struggled to maintain Amiga's lead, and through a number of bizarre business decisions (refusing to license the Amiga design to Sun), went bankrupt. Read about the history of the Commodore Amiga at Low End Mac.
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Huh?
by Sabah Arif on Sat 2nd Sep 2006 20:52 UTC
Sabah Arif
Member since:
2006-09-02

What's inaccurate about the article? I liked it.

Kind of amazing how many times Commodore shot itself in the foot. I think the Tramiel culture caused Commodore to be really cheap and really conservaitve and really cocky. I wonder what he does now?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Huh?
by PLan on Sat 2nd Sep 2006 21:18 in reply to "Huh?"
PLan Member since:
2006-01-10

I think the Tramiel culture caused Commodore to be really cheap and really conservaitve and really cocky. I wonder what he does now?

Apparently -

... Jack Tramiel is now retired and living in Monte Sereno, California, with his wife Helen, who he married in 1947 shortly after his immigration from Poland. They have three sons : Sam (born 1950), Leonard (born 1955 or 1956), and Garry (born 1959 or 1960). The Tramiels also have several grandchildren.

Jack Tramiel is also an active member of the Anti-Defamation League. His son Sam is a Vice Chair of the ADL regional board in California.

It is rumored (though several former employees have claimed to have seen it) that Jack has a large gold and stainless steel sword from Atari's SwordQuest contest in his living room. It was not awarded because the contest was cancelled after the company's sale, due to an apparent lack of interest among gamers and corporate staff. ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Tramiel

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Huh?
by Saad on Sat 2nd Sep 2006 21:21 in reply to "RE: Huh?"
Saad Member since:
2005-08-27

Apparrently, he and his son have worked together a while. His son appeared in a Computer Cronicles episode with his father to demo the Atari ST.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Huh?
by trezzer on Sat 2nd Sep 2006 21:23 in reply to "Huh?"
trezzer Member since:
2006-01-05

Mostly some of the really rough generalizations towards the end such as Amigas not having developed to follow the PCs. Upgraded models were available and add-ons and accelerator cards upped the performance of available models. Furthermore I fail to see what Win 3.x offered that was comparable with a fully multitasking machine capable of doing video work right out of the box (but let's not let that be the re-opening of the whole PC vs Amiga discussion at the time).

Besides that the AGA Amigas were quite successful (in Europe at least), both for gaming and serious work. The machine that preceeded them (A3000) was also quite a powerhouse and was even offered as a UNIX workstation in the form of A3000UX. These machines were more powerful than most UNIX workstations of the day. Commodore managed to shoot itself in the foot with this machine as well, but that's a different story and has nothing to do with the machine not being seen as powerful.

The final paragraph is basically plain wrong. Yes, AmigaOS is owned by Amiga Inc. but they're not licensing it to manufacturers whose computers are used in video production.

AmigaOS is, like I mentioned previously, being developed by Hyperion Entertainment and Amiga Anywhere (which is based in Intent and runs on various platforms) is developed by Amiga Inc. Third party manufacturers are developing hardware for AmigaOS 4 but not for video production - they are for desktop usage and the OS is not even ready to support video production since there's currently no tv out or even video editing software available for the new platform.

Edited 2006-09-02 21:24

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Huh?
by Nezumi on Sun 3rd Sep 2006 12:25 in reply to "RE: Huh?"
Nezumi Member since:
2006-04-02

As an ex-Amiga enthusiast, a few things spring to mind. Virtual Memory is one. I believe that a 3rd party app was available for Amiga's with a non-EC CPU. I also understand that VM is a standard _now_. In the 3.1 days Amiga's did not have widespread resolution and colour depth abstraction. I seem to remember that 3rd party cards were available, and that apps could be written to use them. This, however was not a standard feature. In my mind, by the time 486DX class PC's were affordable the Amiga was stagnant and I left the platform. I still have very fond memories though, and it will always have a special place in my heart.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Huh?
by Malcolm on Sun 3rd Sep 2006 08:20 in reply to "Huh?"
Malcolm Member since:
2005-07-25

Actually I always thought Tramiel was the one who made Commodore grow. When he moved (had to move?) to Atari, it was the time of the C64. Amiga was financed by Atari before Commodore managed to sneak in. Then he had his own problems at Atari: the ST was nice but competing with the Amiga was really impossible at that point.

The way I see it, Commodore killed the Amiga by not realising how rapidly IBM compatible systems were evolving. Around 1992/93, when the A1200 was launched, MS-DOS based machines came equipped with Sound Blasters and VGA or SVGA. It was really way too late.

Edited 2006-09-03 08:25

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Huh?
by trezzer on Sun 3rd Sep 2006 12:58 in reply to "RE: Huh?"
trezzer Member since:
2006-01-05

"The way I see it, Commodore killed the Amiga by not realising how rapidly IBM compatible systems were evolving. Around 1992/93, when the A1200 was launched, MS-DOS based machines came equipped with Sound Blasters and VGA or SVGA. It was really way too late."

It's not as if they hadn't noticed the growth in the IBM market. It is an oft cited reason for the demise of Commodore that they tried to compete in the PC markete where the competition was fierce and margins were minimal. Of course that's just one of the reasons. Another is that the management changed too often and every time new management came in previous prestige projects were axed. I recommend digging out one of the many Dave Haynie interviews if you want to read more about that.

Comparing MS-DOS machines with Amiga 1200s is a bit misunderstood, though, in my opinion. The Amiga 1200 was designed to be a cheap entry machine like the A500 - but times were changing and people were spending more money on computers (and would continue to do so for many years really).

Comparing apples to apples you should compare it to the A3000 that came before the A1200 or the A4000 that was there for the business segment. The A3000 and A4000 both only had 8 bit audio but were expandable using Zorro 3 slots for sound cards, graphics cards and the like.

The Amiga 3000 was a monster machine when it came out. It had a built-in flicker fixer (which meant you could use the same resolutions as on the average PC at the time), SCSI 2, 68030 that was upgradeable and a fast bus for expansion. In my opinion the only home systems comparable at the time were NeXTStep machines and while their development tools were far more advanced they were somewhat lacking in the multimedia department when compared to the Amiga.

But reality is that lots of things killed Commodore. First and foremost the management's incompetence in various areas.

Reply Parent Score: 3