Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 4th Sep 2006 03:44 UTC, submitted by Velcro_SP
OSNews, Generic OSes 12 years after the project was conceived, and after a long period in which it was useable though incomplete, FreeDOS has reached version 1.0. The ISO is downloadable at SourceForge. Versions with more extras should be available soon, as should a mail-order option.
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RE[2]: 12 years!
by Coxy on Mon 4th Sep 2006 11:50 UTC in reply to "RE: 12 years!"
Coxy
Member since:
2006-07-01

"and lot of business run on it."

Name one... a serious one, one that's likely to get the world talking about FreeDos, not a diy shop in your village that only uses dos because they never made enough money to update their computers.

I'm sure the BT's and AT&T's of this world can't wait to get their hands on this... now all those 286's they've been keeping underwraps waiting for this day can finally get polished and switched on...

12 Years.... I say again 12 years... maybe it's a spelling mistake? It must be v0.1. We can't seriously expect them to have reached version 1 in just 12 years - that's crazy. Who have they got as programmers? The same people coding Duke Nukem Forever?

Edited 2006-09-04 11:51

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: 12 years!
by Sparrowhawk on Mon 4th Sep 2006 12:02 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
Sparrowhawk Member since:
2005-07-11

"Name one... a serious one, one that's likely to get the world talking about FreeDos, not a diy shop in your village that only uses dos because they never made enough money to update their computers. "

I'm guessing that he meant DOS full stop, rather than FreeDOS. DOS generally speaking is still in use, I come across it from time to time (about twice a year). Usually some legacy app that is undocumented, unsupported but is fairly critical to a business process has kept the app in place.

As an example, last year I did some work at two seperate financial institutions here in the UK. One was using some DOS-based Pascal and Dbase programs which needed converting to VB, another was running a critical actuarial application written in, I think APL (or whatever the programming language made up of symbols is called?). The latter could not be converted as to do so would be to risk introducing an error which would have caused untold reputational and financial issues.

Projects like FreeDOS allow people such as myself to run a solid DOS in emulation, to try out what-ifs when looking at migrating apps and data.

Plus just the sheer technical prowess of the FreeDOS team is to be applauded.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: 12 years!
by TechGeek on Mon 4th Sep 2006 12:38 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

OK. GKN. Its a powdered metal company. They have a lot of older machines that cost millions of dollars to buy, which are old and run a dos based interface. No your not going to see a lot of use in modern companies. But there are still thousands of companies that have older production and engineering machinery that all run through dos. Whether its for control, calibration, diagnostics, or what, DOS is still out there in more places than you might think.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: 12 years!
by ebasconp on Mon 4th Sep 2006 14:40 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

Come on dude!!!

It is easy criticize when you're not walking on other's shoes!! Respect the work of these devs and if you are not going to use it, ignore it but do not criticize it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: 12 years!
by protagonist on Mon 4th Sep 2006 15:00 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
protagonist Member since:
2005-07-06

OK, how about every business running Windows today. In case you don't know it they are all built on top of DOS. All the DOS commands still work on any Windows machine I have seen to date and you can boot to a command prompt to use them. Want a true image of your HD? the only way to get an exact copy of your HD is from a DOS prompt. So I think the project is highly relevant in todays world.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: 12 years!
by progster on Mon 4th Sep 2006 15:04 in reply to "RE[3]: 12 years!"
progster Member since:
2005-07-27

that's simply not true, nt based operating systems have nothing to do with DOS.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_NT
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_the_Windows_NT_operati...

edit: typo's

Edited 2006-09-04 15:06

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: 12 years!
by helf on Mon 4th Sep 2006 17:30 in reply to "RE[3]: 12 years!"
helf Member since:
2005-07-06

uh, no? Windows hasn't had a 'DOS base' since windows ME. Why do people still spread this around?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: 12 years!
by siki_miki on Tue 5th Sep 2006 02:25 in reply to "RE[3]: 12 years!"
siki_miki Member since:
2006-01-17

Windows 9x (9,98,ME) were built on windows, but NOT 2000, XP,2003, Vista...thex just provide DOS virtualisation and emulation layer (a fairly buggy and incomplete one). Yes, drive naming, commands and even many filenames are DOS legacy.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: 12 years!
by Don T. Bothers on Mon 4th Sep 2006 15:21 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
Don T. Bothers Member since:
2006-03-15

Just because you don't find a use for it doesn't make it useless. Maybe you weren't around during the golden age of PCs but people who were appreciate it a lot. Some people actually loved DOS, learning to hack the autoexec.bat files. Some people remember the joy of learning the difference between extended and expanded memory and getting better graphics in Wing Commander 1 and 2. Some remember the nice friendly blue screen of Word Perfect. Maybe you never played The Secret of Monkey Island, Populous, Centurion, King's Quest, or Space Quest but people who did, appreciate the existence of a modern DOS that allows you to go back and play the best games ever made. For you, the advent of gaming probably started with Madden 2001 and Quake 3 Arena, but for those who started back in the 80's, we understand the value of DOS and the revolution it caused.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: 12 years!
by Coxy on Mon 4th Sep 2006 19:38 in reply to "RE[3]: 12 years!"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

Yes and some people don't, like me. I played Monkey Island, etc., and your not the only one who's gaming experience started in the 80's...

If you liked the 80's computers so much give me your current computer and I'll give you a 486 I've got in my loft.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: 12 years!
by n0xx on Mon 4th Sep 2006 19:38 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
n0xx Member since:
2005-07-12

MSI uses FreeDOS to host they're bios updater since that's the only way to do it on some older MBs. They've used it successfully for some time... 6 years at least.

Yup, 12 years is a lot of time. You should however keep in mind that it took MS 15 years to develop they're own implementation of DOS that, as I'm sure you know, was bought from some guy in Seattle, was originally named QDOS and was already functional. Also note that the final stand alone version of MS-DOS (6.22) had less features than FreeDOS. OSS has not only beaten MS timeframe by two years, it has also achieved better results.

Know your facts.

Edited 2006-09-04 19:41

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: 12 years!
by Coxy on Mon 4th Sep 2006 19:47 in reply to "RE[3]: 12 years!"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

Those aren't facts.

Better results? And faster? Have the makers of FreeDos developed the largest software company in existance? Better results my arse. Less time? MS finished their product years ago!!! lol

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: 12 years!
by Anonymous Coward on Mon 4th Sep 2006 23:38 in reply to "RE[2]: 12 years!"
Anonymous Coward Member since:
2005-07-06

I used to install cash registers for a little while. There are still a lot that use DOS. I also worked at a HESS Gas station...and can you guess what the Point of Sale systems ran? DOS.

There are a few real world applications for you.

Reply Parent Score: 1