Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 6th Sep 2006 14:07 UTC, submitted by Moulinneuf
Linux "Is Michael Robertson afraid of anything? The entrepreneur has a made a career - and a fortune - playing rough with giants. Now, though, he's turning up the volume: predicting an end to Apple's hold on digital music, shaking up the Linux community by looking to marry open source smarts with proprietary know-how, and talking trash about Microsoft's new Zune. Pay attention, because this is a guy who finds a way to win every time he mixes it up."
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PJBonoVox
Member since:
2006-08-14

I can't help thinking it's because vendors don't want to be locked in with what some (including me) consider a horrifically viral license.

If it was under the BSD license, I'm sure we'd see more of it.

"Apple makes the best MP3 player today."

I beg to differ on that point for sure. They penetrate the market-- That doesn't make them the best. By that train of thought Windows is the best operating system and Dell make the best PCs.

Edited 2006-09-06 21:55

Reply Parent Score: 1

r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

The format specification is in the public domain. What is so horribly viral about that? See: http://vorbis.com/faq/#flic

So you might not be able to get a quick freebie, when you object to the licensing of Xiphs own software implementation, but since the format is PD, there is nothing stopping you or anybody else from writing Ogg compatible software under any license one sees fit.

Reply Parent Score: 3

hal2k1 Member since:
2005-11-11

//since the format is PD, there is nothing stopping you or anybody else from writing Ogg compatible software under any license one sees fit.//

And in fact many people have done exactly that.

Open format <> open source.

It is pure misinformation that might have suggested otherwise.

Edited 2006-09-07 03:38

Reply Parent Score: 1

AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

er, what the hell does the software license of the reference implementation of Vorbis have to do with whether or not you choose to use it? It's not like you have to use their code. Or is the reference implementation of MP3 decoding better licensed? Do you use that code?

Reply Parent Score: 1

Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

"I can't help thinking it's because vendors don't want to be locked in with what some (including me) consider a horrifically viral license. "

You dont think and you dont know what your talking about , the GPL is a license in use commercially and is not viral , you have to choose to use it or choose the software that use it to encounter it , but then the truth never got in the way of your falacy ...

BSD's are a four decade ( 36 years ) License that is so bad that today its almost not in use at all for anything , people take the code and switch it to something else.

http://www.vorbis.com/faq/#flic

What licensing applies to the Ogg Vorbis format?

"The Ogg Vorbis specification is in the public domain. It is completely free for commercial or noncommercial use. That means that commercial developers may independently write Ogg Vorbis software which is compatible with the specification for no charge and without restrictions of any kind. However, the software packages we have developed are available under various free/open-source software licenses with varying allowances and restrictions."

http://www.vorbis.com/faq/#slic

What licensing applies to the included Ogg Vorbis software?

" Most (but not all) of our utility software is released under the terms of the GNU GPL. The libraries and SDKs are released under our BSD-like license.

Note that developers are still free to use the specification to write implementations of Ogg Vorbis licensed under other terms."

"If it was under the BSD license, I'm sure we'd see more of it. "

I bet one gazillion dollar your wrong ! Now pay up ...

Reply Parent Score: 1