Linked by Martin Girard on Tue 12th Sep 2006 13:57 UTC
Linux You must remember the period where various electronic devices, from phones to radios, were available in transparent cases. You may have found them utterly cool. Yet the simple fact that you can't find these things on the shelves anymore (except for do-it-yourself PC cases) means the crowd doesn't find them nearly that cool. While you may not see the link yet, this is exactly why the Linux desktop will never be popular.
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Geek is Sheek
by Guppetto on Tue 12th Sep 2006 14:38 UTC
Guppetto
Member since:
2005-07-06

Linux will become mainstream, because it is rapidly becomming a business buzzword for the anti-windows campaign that seems to be garnering some momentum for some reason.

However, while Linux can easily be dumbed down and implemented as a replacement for XP/Vista or OS X, I'd ask everyone why exactly they'd want Linux to become a dominant desktop OS. If it actually did start canibolizing market share, all you'd really have to look forward to is a rash of Virus writers, con artist, and technological uninformed crybabies telling you what needs to change about it. Sure you'd get more windows only apps ported, but i think we all underestimated how hard some people work to give Windows a bad name. Do you really want to see all that dedication focused on Linux. Trust me when I say that no OS can stand up to all that didicated effort.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Geek is Sheek
by aent on Tue 12th Sep 2006 16:02 in reply to "Geek is Sheek"
aent Member since:
2006-01-25

If it actually did start canibolizing market share, all you'd really have to look forward to is a rash of Virus writers, con artist, and technological uninformed crybabies telling you what needs to change about it

Well for the first item (virus writers), I don't think that would be a real issue. Remember, Linux patches security issues usually within a day or two, there are no monthly patch policies or anything, so when there is an issue, you'll see a patch VERY fast. Also, remember that Linux can also have people working on the other side (and in fact, does) to perform security audits. There also are proactive security features being implemented in Linux, like Mandatory Access Control that RHEL3 has and AppArmor that Novell has. I believe stuff like that will prevent viruses. And as long as programs are distributed in packages, spyware can easily be completely removed by removing the package that installed it, and that will remove it entirely. There is no way for the package to install hidden files that run on startup. The OS definitely can and WILL stand up to that effort and do a whole lot more. There is a lot of incentives for people to patch security holes fast as they usually cause millions in damage. Viruses will be dead.

Reply Parent Score: 1