Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Sep 2006 16:00 UTC, submitted by Sonia Mehta
Apple "I want Vista to be a better OS than it's been promoted to be, but at the same time, I also want OS X to finally receive the public adoption that it deserves. Now is the time for Apple to creatively promote its Macintosh platform with OS X. This is the critical hour, and if Apple is able to take advantage of the uneasy feeling that many have towards Vista, then they could attract an untold amount of new users."
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RE: ...
by TheAmazingJambi on Thu 14th Sep 2006 16:33 UTC in reply to "..."
TheAmazingJambi
Member since:
2006-08-20

That's another thing...if Jobs ever decided to release the Mac OS for whitebox PCs, he could grab up to half of the home market in a few months time. Apparently, the risk or lack of increased profit that this would bring has put him off.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ...
by evangs on Thu 14th Sep 2006 16:36 in reply to "RE: ..."
evangs Member since:
2005-07-07

Which goes to show, having a larger market share doesn't necessarily translate into healthier profits.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: ...
by alcibiades on Thu 14th Sep 2006 17:04 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
alcibiades Member since:
2005-10-12

The empirical evidence is that profitability plotted against market share is U shaped. Companies are usually very profitable at low shares (because they are niche producers and highly differentiated - think high end Hi Fi companies making tube amps, for instance). And they are profitable at high shares because of economies of scale.

In the middle you are not differentiated but are relatively high cost, and so you can't get premium prices or sell cheap enough, so you get poor returns. In the phrase, you are different but not differentiated. That is, you are different from the high share guys, but not in a way that adds any value to your customers.

So the danger for Apple would be, sell a lot of OSs, but not reach MS economies of scale, and become so much a standard product that they were not valuably different. It isn't silly to decline to try it. What is really silly however is articles like the OS Weekly one that seem not to even understand the problem exists.

Edited 2006-09-14 17:05

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by collinm on Thu 14th Sep 2006 17:18 in reply to "RE: ..."
collinm Member since:
2005-07-15

don't think apple can get half of the market

everybody can buy an apple machine but very few do it

there are not enougt software, too limited...

on windows and linux you have 23 email client, 47 software to create dvd.....

people like variaty...

the only problem for linux, hp, dell, compaq, gateway don't sale pc under linux

they have fear of microsoft?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: ...
by Square on Thu 14th Sep 2006 18:01 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
Square Member since:
2005-10-01

the only problem for linux, hp, dell, compaq, gateway don't sale pc under linux

they have fear of microsoft?


There are far too many problems with OEMs installing linux then just fear of microsoft. For example what distro would they use?

Ubuntu? then tell customers they have to do things illegal to get multimedia playback

Linspire? Then deal with the hordes of anti-linspire zelots bitching that its not "real" linux

Then you have the issue of 3rd party software, and I don't just mean MS office. When you buy a system chances are it's preloaded with all sorts of ads, stuff like AoL, yahoo toolbar ect. While the lack of these things is a good thing for the customer part of the reason OEMs still sell 299$ PCs is they make money off the advertising space on the desktop

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: ...
by TusharG on Thu 14th Sep 2006 18:43 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
TusharG Member since:
2005-07-06

I dont need 23 email client and 47 DVD softwares to fetch 10-15 emails and for writing 1 dvd in a week!
What really a bottle neck is Cost of Apple machines. Recently i got a new HP notebook for $800 and with same screen size and RAm and disk storage Apple notebook would have costed me $1800 .. I guess u must have got my point?
I'll rather buy $800 notebook and $200 OS... Apple is making huge amount of money by not only selling OS but their main money money is coming by selling hardware and they are not ready to give up that....
But the fact here remains important that most of the apple hardware are "state of the art" ... people who can afford to have apple hardware are not going to stop buying the same ... but they can double the sell of OS by supporting other hardware... Ofcourse the down side is.... support activity in Apply will increase...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: ...
by maffoo on Thu 14th Sep 2006 18:48 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
maffoo Member since:
2006-08-19

there are not enougt software, too limited...

on windows and linux you have 23 email client, 47 software to create dvd.....

people like variaty...


I don't think this is the problem. Most Windows users stick with Internet Explorer, and I bet a large proportion use Outlook Express for e-mail simply because they're the defaults.

The average consumer wouldn't have any problem with Safari and Mail if they switched to OSX. Let's face it, most home PC users don't need specific software, as long as they have a decent web browser, an e-mail client and a word processor they would be happy. The only software the average user might need that would cause a problem if they switched to a Mac are games.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: ...
by godawful on Thu 14th Sep 2006 19:09 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
godawful Member since:
2005-06-29

and mac's have over 80 web browsers...
http://darrel.knutson.com/mac/www/browsers.html

but people only need one, maybe two.

Edited 2006-09-14 19:11

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: ...
by aent on Thu 14th Sep 2006 18:06 in reply to "RE: ..."
aent Member since:
2006-01-25

That is entirely untrue. They would completely fail to grab half of the home market. Too many people have applications that are incompatible with OS X, and currently OS X has nearly no drivers. I know if I tried to use my TV tuner card under OS X, I'd be SOL. Apple will have the same exact problems as Linux has in market share adoption, and will remain at numbers quite similar. Most people won't want to go out and buy something that will remove all of their current programs and their current way of life. Apple would just get a couple more geeks who are poorer, and thats it.

Reply Parent Score: 1