Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 17th Sep 2006 21:22 UTC
In the News "Some buyers of Apple's new MacBook notebook are hopping mad about random restarts and heat problems that don't fit with Apple's image. Still, Dell might be happy to have Apple's current problem and a bit of its banked reputation. How long can a solid-gold brand take a beating and keep on ticking? Apple Computer will find out this quarter with the growing list of user complaints about its recently released MacBook notebook model randomly shutting down."
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Intel Boards
by hraq on Sun 17th Sep 2006 22:46 UTC
hraq
Member since:
2005-07-06

"Apple engineering may have gone wrong somehow with the MacBook. Or perhaps the trouble will be found in just some of the production runs for the notebook."

What would you expect from an intel board v 1; and what would you expect from Sony battery, I personally would not expect much.

Of course you cannot compare intel boards with IBM/Motorolla, which concentrate on quality than speed.

Current Core2 Duo motherboards from intel don't have a boot menu to let you choose the boot device you want to start, including the best of the line 975x which cost about 300 $, whereas all other board manufacturers allow this feature and all you to do it by pressing F8 or F12 or Esc.

Intel don't look to quality as much as they are looking for performance or any thing with market value; IBM, Sun and AMD on the other hand are very keen to quality, thats why they were the pioneers to start controlling heat from their CPUs rather than being obssessed with performance alone.

I hope that Apple didn't choose the bad platform to support after all, because customers are not willing for another platform change.

Apple Engineers should release the cause of the problem to let customers know where is the problem and that It is not comming from Apple in order not to loose faith in their products.

I am sad for Apple and for the customers who expect the quality in Apple Land.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Intel Boards
by rayiner on Sun 17th Sep 2006 23:01 in reply to "Intel Boards"
rayiner Member since:
2005-07-06

Bullshit.

None of the problems reported with the MacBook had anything to do with Intel. They were all Apple flaws, in the cooling, the casing, etc.

The PowerPC machines were no better in that regard. Remember all the dead G3 notebook logic boards, the TiBook peeling paint, etc, etc.

And its comical you say AMD is "very keen to quality". It is only in the last few years that AMD quality has become acceptable. To this day AMD systems (largely because of supporting infrastructure), are less reliable than Intel ones. Its exceedingly rare to find an Intel motherboard that crashes randomly. It's par for the course on AMD motherboards.

Also, don't forget that the Intel switch means no more Apple chipsets. That in and of itself will decrease the problems with systems enormously.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Intel Boards
by elektrik on Mon 18th Sep 2006 00:50 in reply to "RE: Intel Boards"
elektrik Member since:
2006-04-18

You're kidding right? You actually believe that Intel Motherboards that randomly crash are exceedingly rare? If you do, I have some (increasingly difficult to find) swampland in Florida for sale (You'll have to do some clean up though-there's at least 8 Intel Motherboards I or my developer friends dumped there because of their complete and utter unreliability)

Edited 2006-09-18 00:52

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Intel Boards
by xrobertcmx on Mon 18th Sep 2006 13:37 in reply to "RE: Intel Boards"
xrobertcmx Member since:
2005-09-21

Pardon?,

I can't speak for G3's. I can barely speak as to the last generation of G4 Powerbooks and then only to say that I personally never had a moments trouble from mine. Nor have I seen any problems with my MacBook. But I only own 1 of the several million that happened to be sold and do not personally know anyone else with one.
As for AMD, I've been using and building AMD based systems ever since my little K6-2 450.
The thing about AMD is that you just can't use cheap components. If you do, things fail. I learned this the hard way back in '01 when I used a Via Based ECS motherboard in a machine. Three Via based boards later I gave up, spent the money, bought an Asus (SIS 745 chipset) and that Machine is still running stable today.
It is the same with the every machine I've built. The only randomly restarting machine I've mistakenly built in the past 5 years was due to a faulty PowerSupply.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Intel Boards
by puddleglum on Mon 18th Sep 2006 00:02 in reply to "Intel Boards"
puddleglum Member since:
2005-07-20

I guess they should have stayed with PowerPC. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Intel Boards
by HappyGod on Mon 18th Sep 2006 03:44 in reply to "Intel Boards"
HappyGod Member since:
2005-10-19

It's Apple's logo on the box, not Intel's. If there's a build issue (and clearly there is), the fault lies with Apple, because they should have performed better QA on their product.

You also cannot argue that you can ignore loads of complaints on the grounds that many are satisfied. That's just a cop-out.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Intel Boards
by Arun on Mon 18th Sep 2006 15:45 in reply to "RE: Intel Boards"
Arun Member since:
2005-07-07

It's Apple's logo on the box, not Intel's. If there's a build issue (and clearly there is), the fault lies with Apple, because they should have performed better QA on their product.

You are making a fatal assumption, that enough QA will always find problems that occur in the field. No company on this planet can have a QA test matrix large enough to handle ever single scenario a customer can put a product through.

Problems can and do happen in the field no matter how good your engineering and system building proccess. Multi-symptom problems are hard to diagnose. Especially if there are marginal parts in manufacturing or the process itself.

You also cannot argue that you can ignore loads of complaints on the grounds that many are satisfied. That's just a cop-out.

So far there is no data that Apple is ignoring the problem. The internet forums are rife with stories of Customers getting an instant exchange at the store. There are some reports that Apple has been unsuccessful in fixing the problem multiple times but that stil means they are doing something about it. I costs Apple money to ship repair products back and forth.

Edited 2006-09-18 15:52

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Intel Boards
by tomcat on Mon 18th Sep 2006 17:40 in reply to "RE: Intel Boards"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

You are making a fatal assumption, that enough QA will always find problems that occur in the field. No company on this planet can have a QA test matrix large enough to handle ever single scenario a customer can put a product through.

Problems can and do happen in the field no matter how good your engineering and system building proccess. Multi-symptom problems are hard to diagnose. Especially if there are marginal parts in manufacturing or the process itself.


None of that relieves Apple of responsibility when failures DO occur.

So far there is no data that Apple is ignoring the problem.

Let's hope that Apple continues to be as responsive.

Reply Parent Score: 1