Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Sep 2006 20:36 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "A friend of mine phoned to ask if I thought he should install Ubuntu Linux on his Macs - a 1.33 GHz G4 iBook currently running OS X 10.4 Tiger and a 1.25 GHz Power Mac G4 tower with OS X 10.3 Panther installed. My friend had read a feature in the local newspaper extolling the virtues of Ubuntu Linux and thought it sounded interesting. Does Ubuntu Linux make any sense for Macintosh users? In my friend's case, I would say no, and I did." My take: I wrote about this subject earlier.
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Quoth the article
by Bnonn on Mon 18th Sep 2006 23:36 UTC
Bnonn
Member since:
2005-09-02

Consequently, if I had a non-Apple PC, Ubuntu Linux would probably be my first choice of operating systems, but with a Mac, you already have the best operating system in world.

C'mon, this is just flamebait. He says, "the main advantage, as I see it, of using a Macintosh is that it runs the Mac OS, which is unmatched and unchallenged in terms of user-friendliness. Like Linux, OS X gives you the stability and power of Unix (albeit from different branches of the Unix family tree), but combined with the best graphic user interface yet devised for personal computers, ease of software installation, and, with rare exceptions, true plug and play - "it just works" - with peripherals and networking support" (emphasis mine).

I don't want to be reactionary, but this is just one guy's rather exaggerated opinion. Personally, as a power user interested in choice and freedom, and concerned about vendor lockin, I find OSX to be quite unfriendly to me---in terms of user-friendliness is it extremely challenged. I prefer the Gnome interface and way of doing things to the OSX way, and completely disagree that OSX has the best user interface yet devised! All the times I've used OSX I've found myself frustrated at what seem to me to be very strange and ineffecient ways of doing things. I've also heard tell that OSX is not as stable as Linux generally is (I've certainly never seen a kernel panic in Ubuntu), and I also find it hard to believe that OSX has a repository containing thousands of software packages which can be installed with a couple of clicks of a button, so the claim about the ease of installing software is pretty dubious. Similarly, plug-and-play has never been a problem for me using Ubuntu (even old Ubuntu versions), so why mention OSX's plug-and-play abilities?

Let's get some objectivity here. "Best operating system in the world"? Maybe for certain people who have simple needs and aren't interested in tinkering, in freedom, etc. I have nothing against this guy having an opinion, or even against the advice he gave his friend---perhaps OSX is the better choice for him. Ubuntu is not for everyone, and if OSX is working well for him, why switch? But the way he presents his point surely makes this a bit of a troll.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Quoth the article
by trezzer on Tue 19th Sep 2006 00:33 in reply to "Quoth the article"
trezzer Member since:
2006-01-05

"I've also heard tell that OSX is not as stable as Linux generally is (I've certainly never seen a kernel panic in Ubuntu)"

Nor have I, but I've seen it just plain reset. The only time I've seen kernel panics in OS X was in the 10.0.x days and on one machine where I had a bad ram module. Kernel panics are something the majority of OS X users will never see.

"and I also find it hard to believe that OSX has a repository containing thousands of software packages which can be installed with a couple of clicks of a button"

I quote from the Fink package database:
"The database was last updated at 23:08 GMT on Monday, September 18 and currently lists 6937 packages in 23 sections."

If you prefer BSD-style ports there are 3420 packages in DarwinPorts.

Besides that places like versiontracker.com and macupdate.com serve as virtual software repositories that indeed let you install with a couple of clicks.

"Similarly, plug-and-play has never been a problem for me using Ubuntu (even old Ubuntu versions), so why mention OSX's plug-and-play abilities?"

Funny you should mention that after I've spent several hours today (in vein but even if I had been successful it would have been quite an operation) to get a USB DVB-T receiver working. Needless to say it's entirely plug'n'play on OS X. That said Linux is certainly improving in this area and out of the box more of my hardware is supported (and properly set up) than with an XP SP 2 install.

Edited 2006-09-19 00:35

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Quoth the article
by aent on Tue 19th Sep 2006 04:30 in reply to "RE: Quoth the article"
aent Member since:
2006-01-25

Besides that places like versiontracker.com and macupdate.com serve as virtual software repositories that indeed let you install with a couple of clicks.

They aren't like the real thing though. I don't get alerts on every single update available, get them automatically downloaded for me, and every single one installed with just one click. With macupdate, I would have to manually compare the version numbers. Then, I need to manually download each file. Then, I need to manually install each package. Thats a whole lot harder then having it do everything for me, like Ubuntu would.

Reply Parent Score: 1