Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th Sep 2006 23:14 UTC
Intel Quad-core processors are only the beginning of what a revitalized Intel has to offer, the company's top executives said here Sept. 26. The chip maker will deliver in November its first quad-core processors - chips that incorporate four processors each - for both desktops and servers, said CEO Paul Otellini here, in an opening keynote speech at the Intel Developer Forum. The quad-core chips themselves will offer up to 70 percent greater performance in desktops and 50 percent in servers.
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RE[2]: improvements ?
by Earl Colby pottinger on Wed 27th Sep 2006 21:37 UTC in reply to "RE: improvements ?"
Earl Colby pottinger
Member since:
2005-07-06

Problem is you are assuming large data flows to each CPU, there are programs that the more CPUs you have the less data needed to be sent to per CPU.

Example: The other day I wanted to resize a collecting of pictures I have (using TAR on BeOS). A quick rough resize is done as fast as I move the mouse, but the smooth-resize takes a few seconds per picture. There is no reason that the picture could not be broken up in 80 or more overlapping pieces and each piece sent to a separate CPU for processing. When you look at the amount of data moved into the CPUs, there is not that much, most of the pictures were less that a meg in size.

Note: following the numbers are just examples not real wold measurements.

If a modern single CPU processes a picture a second, we have to move 2 MBytes/sec on the buss. If we have 80 CPUs of the same power, we have to move 160 MBytes/sec to keep up. This is not even close to what a modern buss can do. For image processing the code for any one function is relatively very small, it will run out of the local cache.

I don't mean to say the above are the true real world figures but I do know in the graphic and photo that doing a lot of simple functions in parallel on a chunk of data makes a lot of sense.

And there are a lot of graphic and photo people out there.

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