Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Oct 2006 21:14 UTC
Internet Explorer Microsoft has confirmed that IE7 will be released as an optional download later this month. The long-awaited next version of Microsoft's browser software will be pushed out as an automatic update a "few weeks" later, probably as part of Microsoft's regular Patch Tuesday update cycle in either November or December. Firms not ready to install IE7 will be able to temporarily block the update.
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RE[2]: Liking what I see...
by hal2k1 on Wed 11th Oct 2006 04:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Liking what I see..."
hal2k1
Member since:
2005-11-11

Well integrated?? What does that mean?
With the OS? Of course it's well integrated with Windows, it's practically inseperable.

With the Internet? Well, it is a browser...

Either way, I don't see how it would be better integrated than another browser.


I don't know if it is that well integrated, even with the internet.

Take scalable graphics for example.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svg
"Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML markup language for describing two-dimensional vector graphics, both static and animated, and either declarative or scripted. It is an open standard created by the World Wide Web Consortium."

OK, so SVG is a web standard.

"Plugin support

In browsers such as Internet Explorer and Safari (Mac OS-only), a plugin is needed to view SVG content. The most widely available SVG plugin on the desktop is from Adobe Systems and supports most of SVG 1.0/1.1. (Adobe's SVG download page now says "Please note that Adobe has announced that it will discontinue support for Adobe SVG Viewer on January 1, 2007.") The current version of Safari ships with the plugin, while Internet Explorer users must separately download it. A legacy plugin was once offered from Corel."


But IE currently only supports it via a plugin.

As an experiment, download the SVG example file from the Wikipedia page. OK, even if you can see it in your Internet Explorer, try importing it as a graphic into a Word document ...

Oops! Out of luck there!

Not so well integrated at all, it would seem.

I wonder how well open web standards such as SVG are supported by IE7 and Office 2007?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Liking what I see...
by dylansmrjones on Wed 11th Oct 2006 05:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Liking what I see..."
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Actually, it's good it's supported through a plug-in. It ought to be a part of system-wide plug-in structure akin to datatypes on Amiga or translators on the BeOS/Zeta/Haiku/Syllable/SkyOS systems or akin to the kits in *step.

Applications shouldn't worry about what elements they support natively - they should support virtually nothing natively, but support virtually everything through systemwide plug-ins. So no place for MS-bashing here.

Plug-ins are good.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Liking what I see...
by hal2k1 on Wed 11th Oct 2006 06:34 in reply to "RE[3]: Liking what I see..."
hal2k1 Member since:
2005-11-11

"Actually, it's good it's supported through a plug-in. It ought to be a part of system-wide plug-in structure akin to datatypes on Amiga or translators on the BeOS/Zeta/Haiku/Syllable/SkyOS systems or akin to the kits in *step.

Applications shouldn't worry about what elements they support natively - they should support virtually nothing natively, but support virtually everything through systemwide plug-ins. So no place for MS-bashing here.

Plug-ins are good."


You will all be pleased to know I found a way to get an SVG graphic into a Word document!

First I downloaded OpenOffice.org. Then I used OpenOffice.org writer to start a new document, and then I inserted a picture of the SVG graphics file. Then I saved the result in MS Word .doc format.

Mind you, once I have got the OpenOfffice.org suite on the system, I'm not at all sure exactly why I needed that last step. I could have just used Firefox to browse the web, and used the OpenOffice program for my document without involving MS Word at all, and save my documents in ISO standard ODF formats, and be standards compliant and integrated all along in the first place. Much easier, and way cheaper to boot.

This way, I don't need any half-baked plug-ins that run out of support and don't properly integrate with the whole desktop environment.

Reply Parent Score: 1