Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 17th Oct 2006 22:00 UTC, submitted by anonymous
OSNews, Generic OSes "When it comes to computers, the average person usually believes that 'newer is better'. After all, you can get more memory, a faster processor, and a larger hard disk, merely by waiting a few months. Old hardware is usually shunned as being of little value. In contrast, the elementary education sector has consistently found traditional educational methods to be superior to the newest, latest, and greatest methods. Some of the most knowledgeable and capable children are produced by the schools that use seemingly antiquated techniques. So what happens when the world of technology collides with the world of education? Why, the Commodore 64 makes a comeback!"
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C64 rules
by Xaero_Vincent on Wed 18th Oct 2006 05:04 UTC
Xaero_Vincent
Member since:
2006-08-18

I have a Commodore 64 and Apple IIe and they really sweet machines.

Programmable out of the box with 16 color VIC II chip and "state-of-the-art" SID chip with three voices and nine octaves of sound.

I went overboard with my C64 and added an expantion card with 16 MB of RAM, 20 MHz 16-bit SuperCPU (1 MHz bus though), JiffyDOS chip that speeds loading 15x, FD-2000 1.6 MB 3.5" floppy drive. It is already 40% faster than a slow 1541 5.25" floppy drive without JiffyDOS, but 15+ times faster with it.

Oh yeah baby... my C64 will smoke any machine of that time period in a second; including some Amiga systems.

To bad there isnt much software to utilize all this power. :-(

Reply Score: 1

RE: C64 rules
by DigitalAxis on Wed 18th Oct 2006 01:08 in reply to "C64 rules"
DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

Well, there's Metal Dust from Protovision.
http://www.protovision-online.de/md/mdstart.htm

That's right, there's actually a company selling games for the Commodore 64.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: C64 rules
by djohnston on Wed 18th Oct 2006 06:22 in reply to "C64 rules"
djohnston Member since:
2006-04-11
RE: C64 rules
by tunkaflux on Wed 18th Oct 2006 13:57 in reply to "C64 rules"
tunkaflux Member since:
2006-01-25

Or if you are into music, check Prophet64. ( http://www.prophet64.com )

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: C64 rules
by Doc Pain on Wed 18th Oct 2006 15:15 in reply to "C64 rules"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Programmable out of the box with 16 color VIC II chip and "state-of-the-art" SID chip with three voices and nine octaves of sound.

In addition, graphics programming on the C64 is a PEEK & POKE - not good. I just remember the HC900, KC85/2, KC85/3 and KC87 built by robotron / RFT in the former GDR. It had KAOS and a better BASIC with implemented graphic atoms and algorithms, from PSET over LINE up to RECTANGLE and even CIRCLE. :-)

I like the C64 to be run by directed current from a battery and the RGB and antenna video output. It is very useful as an amateur television (ATV) control and test system here.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: C64 rules
by jack_perry on Wed 18th Oct 2006 16:39 in reply to "RE: C64 rules"
jack_perry Member since:
2005-07-06

In addition, graphics programming on the C64 is a PEEK & POKE - not good. I just remember the HC900, KC85/2, KC85/3 and KC87 built by robotron / RFT in the former GDR. It had KAOS and a better BASIC with implemented graphic atoms and algorithms, from PSET over LINE up to RECTANGLE and even CIRCLE. :-)

The TRS-80 Color Computer's Extended BASIC (by Microsoft! back when they were the good guys) had that, PLUS:
+ PUT and GET commands that allowed one to implement some simple animation fairly easily;
+ a PLAY command that allowed you to play one-voice music using a simple string (e.g. PLAY("CDEFGABC") would play a scale in quarter notes; one could modify with flats, sharps, and length of notes);
+ artifact colors that allowed you to get around Tandy's obsession with black and white at higher resolutions (it's not a bug, it's a feature! :-)).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: C64 rules
by SamuraiCrow on Wed 18th Oct 2006 17:04 in reply to "RE: C64 rules"
SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

There was an Extended Basic cartridge you could get that would add those routines to Commodore Basic. You could even do structured looping.

Peeks and pokes were better, though, if you wanted to learn Assembly language because that was what you had to work with in Assembly.

As for the best educational programming language for the C64, there's always Commodore COMAL which was a hybrid between Basic, Pascal, and Logo. European schools based on Comal had better turned-out programmers sooner becuase they didn't have to teach three separate programming languages.

Reply Parent Score: 1