Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 18th Oct 2006 21:54 UTC
Slackware, Slax Slackware Linux 11 was released at the beginning of this month, which marks 13 years of continued development. Slackware Linux, while not the first Linux distribution, is the oldest surviving one, and is starting to show signs of aging. The first version of Slackware Linux was released on July 16, 1993, by Patrick Volkerding. More here.
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ahh nostalgia
by Square on Thu 19th Oct 2006 00:41 UTC
Square
Member since:
2005-10-01

Back when I first tried linux, around the end of 1996, I chose Slack do to well made documentation explaining each step in the install as well as what files I needed to download to get a base install with a gui and c++ (a big deal when still useing a 33.6 dial-up(most other distros basicly said download everything))

Dependancy problems with installing software wasn't as big of a deal as it is today, it was rare to find a program that needed more then one other lib installed

It supported all my hardware with a bit of work and research. It supported my funky propriitary 1x cd-rom drive that required its own ISA interface card. My soundcard required me to boot into dos/windows first to initialize its PnP crap before linux could use it. The modem worked out of the box, but there was no tool for connecting to my isp. I spent like 3 weeks trying to get it to work before finding a script that did it for me with a ppp-on and ppp-off on the command line to connect to my isp.

Now its 10 years later ( doesn't seem that long) while im tempted to install Slack again I'm not sure if I want to deal with the dependancy hell that is modern linux software without a package manager

Reply Score: 2

RE: ahh nostalgia
by dimosd on Thu 19th Oct 2006 06:56 in reply to "ahh nostalgia"
dimosd Member since:
2006-02-10

Now its 10 years later ( doesn't seem that long) while im tempted to install Slack again I'm not sure if I want to deal with the dependancy hell that is modern linux software without a package manager

You know, I think part of the dependency hell is caused by the package manager itself! Imagine this: "needs gnome". Now compare to "needs libfoo, libwhatsitsname-dev, etc"

Everyone who tried to use a minimal selection of packages on the desktop sooner or later ends up with 90% of the same "common base" and I think that's what Slackware is trying to offer. Having said that: more CDs, less work ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2