Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 21st Oct 2006 22:59 UTC, submitted by Christian Jensen
Debian and its clones Steve McIntyre visited the LiMux team in Munich and has posted a small report about the visit on his blog. LiMux is the specially tailored Debian distribution City of Munich deploys. "I'd like to talk some more about LiMux, the project being run within the City of Munich to replace all of their desktop Windows systems with Linux. They gave us a demonstration and answered lots of our questions."
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RE: A pity
by desNotes on Sun 22nd Oct 2006 01:18 UTC in reply to "A pity"
desNotes
Member since:
2006-05-26

After reading the two articles Notparker linked, I can see why the city of Munich went with Linux over Microsoft. As was pointed out, it may be paying more initially, but over the long run they expect to be paying less and will be able to configure the desktops the way they are needed, not the way Microsoft specifies.

I have worked for several companies, both as an IT employee and not, and for the most part every Windows installation for non-programmers was set up the same. Not all of the MS Office applications were utilized by each person but they were still paid for and installed.

The city of Munich is setting a precedent which the IT world will be watching. Desktop configuration, OS updates, support, training, etc. will all be interesting to see in the coming months and years.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: A pity
by sbergman27 on Sun 22nd Oct 2006 01:49 in reply to "RE: A pity"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""After reading the two articles Notparker linked, I can see why the city of Munich went with Linux over Microsoft. As was pointed out, it may be paying more initially, but over the long run they expect to be paying less and will be able to configure the desktops the way they are needed, not the way Microsoft specifies."""

To a great extent, Microsoft's business model depends upon there being a large number of people who don't think past the short term.

Those who think long term slip right through MS's net.

Let's hope that Munich's example makes it easier for other municipalities to see further down their own roads.

These kinds of migrations are never easy, but do result in tools and techniques that make it easier for the next fellow.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: A pity
by Hands on Mon 23rd Oct 2006 15:42 in reply to "RE[2]: A pity"
Hands Member since:
2005-06-30

I was thinking much the same thing.

I have heard many people make comments to the effect that Linux has lost momentum, but I think that the reality has been that Linux (and Apple to some degree) have spurred competitive action from Microsoft. Microsoft has always had to compete with their own success, but now they are competing with the success of outside competitors. The resulting actions from Microsoft may have given the appearance that Linux and Apple have slowed down, but I think the competitive landscape will only get more fierce.

As initiatives like this one continue, open source tools will become more mature, and migrations away from a monopolized market with increase. I don't think Microsoft will become marginalized, but I do think that they will be force to become and remain more competitive as migrations and tools become cheaper and better. The result will be better Linux as well as a better Microsoft products for everyone.

Reply Parent Score: 1