Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Oct 2006 21:05 UTC, submitted by wuda
Java Demonstrating a perhaps more aggressive path than anticipated, Sun Microsystems is set to announce the open-sourcing of the core Java platform within 30 to 60 days, Sun President and CEO Jonathan Schwartz said at the Oracle OpenWorld conference on Wednesday morning.
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bnolsen
Member since:
2006-01-06

Java's never gotten traction in the open source world. Definitely not anywhere on the desktop.

And it's pretty pitifully unstable under some circumstances on servers.

With some new exciting stuff coming out (like 'D') and the convenience of running true scriping languages I just don't see Java doing anything other than continue to lose interest...

Reply Score: -2

someone Member since:
2006-01-12

Java's never gotten traction in the open source world.

Did you ever bother visiting apache.org and have a look at their top level projects (most of them are widely used in the enterprise world)? How about looking at the percentage of sf.net projects using Java?

Definitely not anywhere on the desktop.

Although Java was never as popular on the Desktop as it is on Servers, I am sure you have heard about both Azureus and Limewire.

With some new exciting stuff coming out (like 'D') and the convenience of running true scriping languages I just don't see Java doing anything other than continue to lose interest...

Except they don't have access to the vast amount of libraries and frameworks that Java has. One example would be WebObjects. Another good example would be java.lang.concurrent. Actually, that's not quite true: many popular scripting languages have Java implementations (eg. JRuby and Mozilla Rhino) which can make use of java frameworks and compile to the Java bytecode.

Edited 2006-10-27 01:11

Reply Parent Score: 5

SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

"Although Java was never as popular on the Desktop as it is on Servers, I am sure you have heard about both Azureus and Limewire."

Yes, they are both bloatware and slow, just like all Java apps. Give me a mono equivalent any day.

Reply Parent Score: 2

phgt Member since:
2006-09-16

It is java.util.concurrent. But you are right, this is an outstanding library for multithreading written by Doug Lea. It has no equivalent in any language AFAIK. I recently an ETL using a pipeline design with this library and it was an order of magnitude faster than a very optimized C++ version.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zambizzi Member since:
2006-04-23

This was perhaps the most woefully ignorant post I've ever seen on an article at OSNews...honestly.

Java has *massive* open source traction...it has surpassed C++ on sourceforge as the post popular language!!

Pitifully unstable? Are you mad? Java is the engine of some of the largest, most active web applications in the world!

D? Exciting stuff? Who the F*** uses D for anything that you hear big news about?

It's annoying, to say the least, when someone spouts off about something purely based on opinion and not at all based in reality.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Archangel Member since:
2005-07-23

Java has *massive* open source traction...it has surpassed C++ on sourceforge as the post popular language!!
But it remains relatively rare on Linux - AFAIK most distros don't bundle it at present (correct me if I'm wrong on that one). I wouldn't consider Sourceforge project numbers a good measure of "open source traction", but it depends what you're trying to measure with that term.

Pitifully unstable? Are you mad? Java is the engine of some of the largest, most active web applications in the world!
It depends heavily on the VM it's running in, and they aren't all created equal. Maybe the previous poster was aiming at something a little more obscure than, say, the x86 VM which is obviously pretty solid by now.

I think it's a good move by Sun, and long past time - I'm not sure what they gained by keeping it closed.
Playing nice with open source definately strikes me as a good idea - .NET is a big threat to Java. Maybe the enemy of Sun's enemy is their friend.

Reply Parent Score: 4