Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Nov 2006 22:56 UTC
Novell and Ximian "Often cast as the peacemaker in free software disputes, Bruce Perens is on the warpath. When we caught up with him, he wasn't in a mood to be charitable to Novell. On Friday the Utah company, which markets the SuSE Linux distribution, revealed that it was entering into a partnership with Microsoft. Redmond would pay Novell an undisclosed sum in return for Novell recognizing Microsoft's intellectual property claims. Novell received a 'Covenant' promising that it wouldn't be sued by Microsoft."It's a case of 'Damn the people who write the software'", he told us. "Novell is in a desperate position - it has a smaller share of the market than Debian,"" he told The Register. Update: Novell responds to community's questions: here, here and here. Update 2: Havoc Pennington's take.
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hal2k1
Member since:
2005-11-11

//Then yes, Linux is much better. //

Agreed.

//I was just pointing out that 20,000 free apps in and of itself isn't a convincing argument. //

It is a perfectly valid point to raise against the false perception that "Windows is where all the apps are". This is just not so. There are in fact far more viable useable applications available for Linux than any end user could possibly ever use. There is no shoratge of apps for Linux.

Therefore, this is a perfectly valid argument to use to counter the false "FUD" perception that there is somehow a shoratge of apps for Linux, and that (presumably) users won't move to Linux because they won't be able to run some type of application. That argument is utterly wrong, and 20,000+ packages proves it to be wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Marcellus Member since:
2005-08-26

Therefore, this is a perfectly valid argument to use to counter the false "FUD" perception that there is somehow a shoratge of apps for Linux, and that (presumably) users won't move to Linux because they won't be able to run some type of application. That argument is utterly wrong, and 20,000+ packages proves it to be wrong.

If none of these 20,000+ packages provide the RIGHT applications, there is definitely a shortage of the RIGHT applications.
I tried to find usable programs for electronics schematics, layout, and things like that. That can import/export ORCAD schematics and layouts. I didn't find anything that comes even close to ORCAD, even if I don't take into account the import/export requirement.

Reply Parent Score: 3

hal2k1 Member since:
2005-11-11

//I tried to find usable programs for electronics schematics, layout, and things like that. That can import/export ORCAD schematics and layouts. I didn't find anything that comes even close to ORCAD, even if I don't take into account the import/export requirement.//

This is true for some vertical-market applications.

For the particular case you mention, this is about it:
http://www.geda.seul.org/index.html

However, there exist other vertical-market areas in which Windows is the platform with a dearth of really viable solutions.

Here is one such area:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_platform#Cross-platform_programm...

Reply Parent Score: 1