Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 22nd Nov 2006 13:22 UTC, submitted by jayson.knight
Microsoft "For the last year or so, one of the questions I've been asked again and again has been: "Can I use the new Office user interface in my own product?" On one hand, it's an immensely satisfying question to hear, because it means that others in the industry believe in the value of what we've built and see how the sound UI research we've done can benefit their own products. Creating the new user interface has been our team's passion for the last three years, and we love sharing the fruits of this hard work. On the other hand, the new Office user interface was a huge investment by Microsoft and the resulting intellectual property belongs to Microsoft."
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Correct URL
by hyper on Wed 22nd Nov 2006 13:55 UTC
hyper
Member since:
2005-06-29

http://blogs.msdn.com/jensenh/archive/2006/11/21/licensing-the-2007...

I think microsoft did a very good thing making everyone use their guidelines. This will add lots of consistency between various applications in the future.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Correct URL
by Doc Pain on Wed 22nd Nov 2006 18:23 in reply to "Correct URL"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"I think microsoft did a very good thing making everyone use their guidelines. This will add lots of consistency between various applications in the future."

Sorry, I don't think you're right here. As you can see from the history of the many different flavours of MICROS~1 programs ans GUIs, the tendency goes to diversion, not to consistency. As long as application programmers that develop "Windows" programs are allowed to design their own UIs, they'll do it. They won't use the published recommendations (at least its preview), they will do their own thing instead.

I'm sure you can simply verify it for your own: Just compare the look of "Windows" applications you can use today. They all look different regarding the UI basics. (It has often been criticised that Linux programs look differnt, depending on the used toolkit.) Now "Windowx" user have this feature some years and they seem to be happy with this inconsistency. MICROS~1's published guidelines (preview) are ugly, inproductive and consume more attention than standard GUI guidelines. Developers will laugh about this. Developers, developers, developers, developers.

The solution: Every program that a deleoper wants to distribute in order to have a user run it under "Windows" has to be certified by MICROS~1 - or it simply won't run anywhere. Send them your source code, they'll compile it for you.

I hope the MICROS~1 industry spied read this post and will include this idea in further "Windows" products - claiming it's a revolutionary milestone. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3