Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 27th Nov 2006 10:55 UTC, submitted by Jean Claude
Linux French députés' offices will be equipped with a Linux operating system and open source productivity software. There will be 1154 French parliamentary workstations running on an open source OS, with OpenOffice.org, Firefox and an open source email client.
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Things to consider
by hraq on Mon 27th Nov 2006 12:27 UTC
hraq
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's an excellent move.

They will still face some other problems:

1. Choosing the right stable distro

2. Upgrading the RAM on all the 1000 PCs currently running windows, as linux is so hungry for RAM.

3. Setting up the permissions of file/program/device access.

4. Updating linux very carefully, as some updates change the kernel and render some device modules useless, unless you rebuild the module for 1000 PC by means of a deployment method

My choice would go with Redhat if they would require any support or CentOS if they don't require any support, but still needs to enjoy the stability power of Redhat.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Things to consider
by collinm on Mon 27th Nov 2006 12:31 in reply to "Things to consider"
collinm Member since:
2005-07-15

hungry?

stop the fud

linux don't need a lot ram, you can run a light windows manager like icewm with 16meg of ram

i use kde on a system with 128 meg of ram

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Things to consider
by hraq on Mon 27th Nov 2006 13:30 in reply to "RE: Things to consider"
hraq Member since:
2005-07-06

"linux don't need a lot ram, you can run a light windows manager like icewm with 16meg of ram "

In your imagination of RAM usage you thought that the problem would be the GNU part of Linux(KDE/GNOME/..), whereas the problem truly is from the applications that you will run on linux.

Linux applications tend to take more RAM than windows counterpart, even for the same application written by the same software developers.

Besides, linux loves Caching, thus your memory will be consumed with cache then when more applications start they will start using swap space, you can easily notice this on gnome-system-monitor in case of GNOME or ksysguard in case of KDE. I am currently running 4 applications on CentOS on 1GB RAM and 15% of swap space is already used, leaving performance of the system to hell. Solution will be to install more RAM.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Things to consider
by NxStY on Mon 27th Nov 2006 14:42 in reply to "RE: Things to consider"
NxStY Member since:
2005-11-12

> linux don't need a lot ram, you can run a light windows
> manager like icewm with 16meg of ram

But do you really think they'll use icewm? ;) They'll probably use whatever the distro ships as default, KDE or gnome.

Edited 2006-11-27 14:44

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Things to consider
by ma_d on Mon 27th Nov 2006 18:17 in reply to "RE: Things to consider"
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

Yea, in general my 192MB system ran much better with KDE than it has with WinXP. The window manager itself sucks up ram like none other, but the applications are tiny as a result of the code reuse.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Things to consider
by walterbyrd on Mon 27th Nov 2006 12:43 in reply to "Things to consider"
walterbyrd Member since:
2005-12-31

What a load of FUD.

>>They will still face some other problems<<

As opposed to what? Do you think windows is problem free? Do you think "upgrading" to Vista will be easy?

>>1. Choosing the right stable distro<<

Easy to do, I'll bet they have already done that. BTW: there are several desktop versions of Vista, and if you chose the wrong one - you have to pay for your mistake.

>>2. Upgrading the RAM on all the 1000 PCs currently running windows, as linux is so hungry for RAM.<<

WTF? The more advanced versions of Vista will not run correctly without 2GB of RAM. And 3D video up the wahzoo.

>>3. Setting up the permissions of file/program/device access.<<

As it should be with any OS. It's called security. Maybe, one day, msft users will understand.

>>4. Updating linux very carefully, as some updates change the kernel and render some device modules useless, unless you rebuild the module for 1000 PC by means of a deployment method<<

Same with windows. Upgrading to W2K broke all kinds of drivers etc. Even XP/SP2 broke all kinds of compatibility.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Things to consider
by hraq on Mon 27th Nov 2006 13:43 in reply to "RE: Things to consider"
hraq Member since:
2005-07-06

">>3. Setting up the permissions of file/program/device access.<<

As it should be with any OS. It's called security. Maybe, one day, msft users will understand. "

I have mentioned that because linux permissions are less than suitable for enterprises; thats why Redhat incorporated SELinux to its OS; namely to have ACLs.

And many linux distros didn't incorporate it yet.

">>4. Updating linux very carefully, as some updates change the kernel and render some device modules useless, unless you rebuild the module for 1000 PC by means of a deployment method<<

Same with windows. Upgrading to W2K broke all kinds of drivers etc. Even XP/SP2 broke all kinds of compatibility."

You said upgrading while I said updating; there is a difference Pal.
Applying updates to windows (lets assume XP with SP1) will not break any application unless you upgrade to SP2; but in linux even updating will break compatiblity (eg Ubuntu 6.10 with old kernel and ubuntu 6.10 with new kernel; and remember I am not talking about ubuntu v 7)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Things to consider
by dylansmrjones on Mon 27th Nov 2006 18:58 in reply to "Things to consider"
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Well, I posted the news several days ago when it was published in Denmark (but nowhere else, apparently).

1) There are many stable distributions. However, they all have a few quirks of their own. Any mainstream distribution will do fine.

2) RAM upgrade isn't necessary. Linux with KDE or Gnome runs fine on older hardware. A new fullyfledged bloated Gnome desktop requires no more than XP with a few minor applications running. 256 MB of ram can do it. 1024 is better, but that's also something I recommend for XP and Win2K3 (512 MB is enough for Win2K).

3) Done mostly automatically. No more configuration needed than with Windows. Perhaps even less (depending on the applications).

4) Updating Linux (the kernel only?) is usually not a problem, but there is no reason for updating apart from security fixes. There is no need for worrying here.

Redhat is definitely a possibility, or perhaps Fedora if they have a good IT-department. There are others they can use, incl. gentoo (requires a wise deployment method - and it makes it difficult for ordinary users to install applications locally) or Ark Linux, Suse or Xandros.

Reply Parent Score: 3