Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 27th Nov 2006 19:36 UTC
Windows "eWEEK Labs has been testing Microsoft Windows Vista builds for more than three years, and our evaluation of the final code shows that the new operating system is a significant improvement over its predecessor, Windows XP. What's more, with a raft of subsystem and driver model improvements, Microsoft has laid out in Vista a solid foundation for stability and usability gains in future Windows versions. For enterprises running XP on their desktops and notebooks, however, a Vista upgrade is no slam-dunk. While Vista's new UAC facilities can make it easier for companies to appropriately lock down their desktops, for instance, it's quite possible to run a well-managed shop of XP machines, either out of the box or with the aid of lockdown tools."
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WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

When I compare the functionality in XP and Windows 2003 Server (as a workstation OS) Gnome/KDE is clearly ahead, unless you install thirdparty applications on Windows. (emphasis mine)

You say that last part as if it is insignificant, but the addition of the 3rd party applications is what seperates Windows from the pack and gives it an advantage.

For example, Windows Explorer is laughably bad, but put Directory Opus on the machine, and no other file manager made thus far can touch it.

As of friend of mine so often says, "I don't like Windows .. I like what I can run on Windows."

Reply Parent Score: 4

dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Well, the functionality one can get by installing third party applications in Windows are already present per default in Gnome/KDE.

I like what I can run on Windows, and I like what I can run on Linux, and I like what I can run on DesktopBSD. None of the systems are ahead of the other in regard to available software, and the quality of the available software.

It's about time the Windows zealots understand that the default installation of Windows on the Desktop lost it's no.1 position years ago (in regard to the functionality, that is). With Vista Microsoft is back in the race when it comes to functionality. It is pretty much on par now with Gnome/KDE and Mac OS X.

The only place where Windows does have an advantage is in hardware support for weird new devices. Everybody makes drivers for Windows, while in Linux/BSD land one has to rely on reengineered OSS drivers most of the time. Usually they are good, but some devices are only partly supported (like nVidia - unless you taint your kernel).

Reply Parent Score: 4

PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

You are right about Linux and OS X being ahead of Windows in their default as-configured states. It took about 30 minutes after installing Vista for me to toy around with the OS to see what was interesting and then realize that it's just another crappy OS that won't change my life one bit.

On the other hand, Office 2007 is pretty cool and I spent a lot more time "toying around" with it (i.e. writing a paper for a class and making some figures in powerpoint) and that's the way it should be. People use computers for the applications and not for the OS. The reason Windows has been such a success despite being inferior to others in some aspects is that it is probably the best OS on which to write commercial applications (including commercial hardware drivers).

Linux and UNIX have a stable user space API for non-GUI applications, but there is not yet a standard and easy way to make closed-source GUI desktop apps for linux and there is also the standard chicken-egg problem of marketshare. The lack of a stable kernel ABI doesn't help either.

OS X has broken both user-space and kernel mode ABIs a number of times as well, but Apple has only 3 or 4 big name commercial software developers on their platform with whom they have pretty strong ties (you can bet that apple and the Microsoft MacBU have a discussion before every OS X release about app. compat.). Commercial developers support the apple market, though, because those consumers are a particularly juicy segment which really enjoys computing and is willing to spend money on software.

In the end, Desktop OSes are really just meant to launch your apps and keep them running. Most people use Windows because they just don't care. Linux will catch on slowly but surely, assuming a desktop API stabilizes and closed-source GUI apps become possible. Apple, on the other hand, will grow a lot faster than linux because they have that juicy consumer segment and now have stable interfaces to all third-party code. To end my prediction, Windows will continue to be the dominant player with >70% marketshare and it will slowly absorb features from the other OSes while improving its development experience and ushering in new kinds of hardware (cf. the new graphics cards and ReadyDrive).

Reply Parent Score: 3

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Directory Opus on the machine, and no other file manager made thus far can touch it.

That's a matter of opinion. I like Konqueror better, and it has some feature that Opus lacks (such as use of kio slaves, terminal emulator and web browsing).

Reply Parent Score: 3

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

That's a matter of opinion. I like Konqueror better, and it has some feature that Opus lacks (such as use of kio slaves, terminal emulator and web browsing).

Dude, that's why it's called a file manager ;) Would you assume that Nero is better than K3B because it has software included to rip DVDs, manage photos, perform backups, etc?

Reply Parent Score: 1

pandronic Member since:
2006-05-18

... but put Directory Opus on the machine, and no other file manager made thus far can touch it.

I disagree. Far Manger ( http://www.farmanager.com ) is the best file manager for Windows. Many get put off by the fact that it's a console application, but the power it gives the user is simply astonishing.

It's one of the very few applications that keeps me tied to the Windows world.

Reply Parent Score: 1

stestagg Member since:
2006-06-03

It's one of the very few applications that keeps me tied to the Windows world.

Have you ever tried Midnight Commander? If I didnt' know better (which I don't), FarManager looks identical to MC (for linux).

Reply Parent Score: 1