Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 4th Dec 2006 22:26 UTC
Novell and Ximian The first fruit of the recently announced Novell/Microsoft interoperability agreement arrived on Dec. 4, with Novell's announcement that its version of the OpenOffice productivity suite will now support the Microsoft Office Open XML format. The release candidate of Novell's modified version of OpenOffice.org 2.02 is now available for Windows for free download by registered Novell users.
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RE: Say what you want
by archiesteel on Mon 4th Dec 2006 23:09 UTC in reply to "Say what you want"
archiesteel
Member since:
2005-07-02

unlike the past decade this time the OSS world will be able to migrate entire organizations to OO.org.

...but only if you're a Novell customer.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Say what you want
by Terracotta on Mon 4th Dec 2006 23:15 in reply to "RE: Say what you want"
Terracotta Member since:
2005-08-15

OpenOffice.org is licensed under the GPL, so soon enough it will be in the normal version as well, since you can't link Openoffice.org to closed code, not through plugins, nor through extra code.

I just hope that they made a plugin kind of thing that can be used by Koffice, abiword, Gnumeric and the like, unlike their .doc filters.

Edited 2006-12-04 23:16

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Say what you want
by archiesteel on Mon 4th Dec 2006 23:17 in reply to "RE[2]: Say what you want"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

I hope you're right...I'll be looking forward to it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Say what you want
by grat on Mon 4th Dec 2006 23:19 in reply to "RE[2]: Say what you want"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

Actually, OOo is LGPL, and the OpenXML is indeed a plugin, which is either BSD or LGPL licensed-- I haven't been bothered enough to check.

So, I suppose, to maintain it's market share, OpenOffice.Org should drop support for the .doc format as well?

Kudos to OSNews for not reporting it as "Novell forks OpenOffice", however.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Say what you want
by DrillSgt on Mon 4th Dec 2006 23:57 in reply to "RE: Say what you want"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"...but only if you're a Novell customer."

Actually I disagree here. I am waiting to see how it all pans out. There is nothing that stops this from being used in the regular OOo at all. OpenXML is just that, open, with the standard fully published. Now I do know Microsoft's track record, but times and things do change. The only thing I see stopping this is the OSS crowd saying since it is from Microsoft, they won't allow it to be done, but I doubt that would happen.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Say what you want
by archiesteel on Tue 5th Dec 2006 00:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Say what you want"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

My response was only due to the wording of the article blurb, i.e. "The release candidate of Novell's modified version of OpenOffice.org 2.02 is now available for Windows for free download by registered Novell users."

The sentence is ambiguous...does it mean it will only be available for registered Novell users? As others have pointed out, OpenOffice is GPLed, so they wouldn't be able to stop it from being redistributed.

I also note (which I hadn't before) that it says "for Windows"...which means that right now it's not available for Linux.

I'm adopting the same attitude as you for now: sit back and watch...though I have to say I will be watching *very* closely. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Say what you want
by lopisaur on Tue 5th Dec 2006 08:41 in reply to "RE: Say what you want"
lopisaur Member since:
2006-02-27

And don't forget: this is for the Windows version of OOo.
MS won't allow them to release a Linux version, I guess.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Say what you want
by smitty on Tue 5th Dec 2006 08:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Say what you want"
smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

What are you talking about??? The code is GPL and not patented, which means anyone can port it to Linux anytime they want to. It's just that certain embedded formats like video may use Windows codecs, but that wouldn't stop OOo from using this code in Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 3