Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 4th Dec 2006 22:26 UTC
Novell and Ximian The first fruit of the recently announced Novell/Microsoft interoperability agreement arrived on Dec. 4, with Novell's announcement that its version of the OpenOffice productivity suite will now support the Microsoft Office Open XML format. The release candidate of Novell's modified version of OpenOffice.org 2.02 is now available for Windows for free download by registered Novell users.
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RE[3]: ah...
by cyrilleberger on Tue 5th Dec 2006 07:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ah..."
cyrilleberger
Member since:
2006-02-01

Because OpenXML is encumbered with patents.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: ah...
by raver31 on Tue 5th Dec 2006 08:15 in reply to "RE[3]: ah..."
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

Are those patents not there to stop someone modifying the algorithm and making a competing format ?

The patents should not come into play simply for a user.

In theory

Edited 2006-12-05 08:15

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: ah...
by tomcat on Tue 5th Dec 2006 17:30 in reply to "RE[3]: ah..."
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

That's FUD. The license specifically contains a Covenant Not to Sue. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenXML#Licensing for details.

The only ones who have to worry about OpenXML are OSS folks who would want to co-opt the format by stealing it and calling the derivative something else. The patent provision keeps that from happening.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[5]: ah...
by twenex on Tue 5th Dec 2006 20:28 in reply to "RE[4]: ah..."
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

The only ones who have to worry about OpenXML are OSS folks who would want to co-opt the format by stealing it and calling the derivative something else.

Erm, I think you are confusing us with Microsoft. OSS fundies don't "co-opt" or "steal" anything, let alone "call it something else"; the utter failure of the SCO suit so far has proved that, and the case hasn't even gone to trial yet.

MS, on the other hand, "co-opted and stole" Kerberos, LDAP and the TCP/IP suite, calling the second of the three "co-opted" products "Active Directory".

Edited 2006-12-05 20:48

Reply Parent Score: 3