Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 23rd Dec 2006 00:48 UTC, submitted by dumbkiwi
KDE This is a response to the article yesterday on the progress of GNOME and KDE. Aaron Seigo, a lead KDE developer, sets out the current state of progress with KDE 4, pointing out that KDE 4 is on track for a release in mid 2007. "Thom points to a quote from me that our goal is to have a 4.0 ready sometime in the first half of next year. That gives us until sometime in June and I'm still thinking we can make it."
E-mail Print r 37   87 Comment(s)
Thread beginning with comment 195637
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Right question, wrong answers
by moleskine on Sat 23rd Dec 2006 09:57 UTC
moleskine
Member since:
2005-11-05

Thom's original article did what a good article should do: it hit on a very raw nerve.

The key point doesn't lie in how gtk+-this and kdelibs4-that are doing. Those are just details. What matters is how the whole Linux desktop project feels about itself - optimistic, or uncertain and a bit down in the dumps?

My guess is that the Linux desktop project doesn't feel too good at the moment. There's a bit of a whiff around. Hmmn, maybe some Chief Gerbil Engineers keeled over a while back and no one's yet noticed. The often furious response to Thom's article strongly suggests that he's on to something here. Hmmn, how much progress does all this Gnome/KDE work really represent when Apple and Microsoft are shortly to move the game to a whole new level?

I can't comment on Aaron Seigo's piece. Nor, I would suggest, can 99 per cent of the rest of the world, since the details he cites are not matters of record but inside details for insiders available (at best) in an svn repository somewhere. He too fails to answer the key question: how does the Linux desktop project feel about itself at the moment?

Reply Score: 4

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

I think Aaron Seigo's reply was quite clear - people involved in KDE feel great about where they are right now. I've seen several other blogs and they all seem very upbeat - I haven't seen any complaining about slow progress or other problems. OTOH, if you mean end users then I think there is a bit of worry.

The thing that really got me about Thom's piece was his assertion that each OSX point release was major but each KDE/GNOME point release was minor. There are supposedly some revolutionary new features in 10.5 that we haven't heard of and he simply takes them at their word, while KDE4 features have been discussed fully and many are already available through SVN if you want to get into it, and apparently they are only vision and no substance according to Thom. What? I don't think Thom was purposely trying to write flamebait or anything, but that just really shouted out to me that he is biased in this area.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Rehdon Member since:
2005-07-06

If I insult you, or if I start spread lies about you, I'm sure I'd get some reaction, you could say I "hit on a very raw nerve": is that good communication? I don't think so.

Est modus in rebus.

rehdon

Reply Parent Score: 5

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"Thom's original article did what a good article should do: it hit on a very raw nerve. "

Eh no, good articles are well written and well researched. Thom's was neither. Hitting a raw nerve is not a measurement of an article's quality. Writing inflammatory articles that causes outrage is easy, writing articles that leads to fruitfull discussion isn't.
The original article was thus a failure.

"when Apple and Microsoft are shortly to move the game to a whole new level? "

They are? Really? I think you're confusing hype with facts. Maybe they are, maybe not but right now we don't know.

"how does the Linux desktop project feel about itself at the moment?"

it's pretty obvious when you read Siego's article that they feel good about it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Right question, wrong answers
by tux68 on Sat 23rd Dec 2006 11:37 in reply to "Right question, wrong answers"
tux68 Member since:
2006-10-24

No, Thom generated a negative reaction because he was so off the mark. It's tiring and a bit depressing to hear so many detractors of open source misconstrue the situation and spew so much gloom and doom. Why do people continue to think that unless our goals are achieved this year or next, all is lost?

For example, over the longer term, the problem with open source drivers will disappear. Eventually we will have all of the major 3D hardware covered by open source drivers. It will happen as the rate of change in the 3D hardware sector diminishes; the current rate of change just won't continue. Once things settle down, there will be a more fixed target to reverse engineer for example. Things are ticking along just fine.

But even if Linux had the best desktop experience in every sense, it would not be an automatic ticket to mass acceptance today. Macintosh, was by all accounts a better desktop experience for quite some time before Microsoft _finally_ borrowed enough ideas to catch up. If it was just desktop that mattered, Apple would be the dominant company today and Microsoft would be the alsoran.

We must take the longer view; slow plodding improvement and promotion is the way to go. Not chicken-little like panic about the sky falling in (or bubbles bursting).

Reply Parent Score: 4

anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

What matters is how the whole Linux desktop project feels about itself - optimistic, or uncertain and a bit down in the dumps?

I'd say definitely optimistic.

Over the last months there has been more cooperation between projects and individual developers than ever before.

Additionally to the shared specifications we see a lot of shared technology, i.e. actual implementation shared between developers, e.g. Poppler.

D-Bus has opened a whole new venue of integration, both between user session components (also some kind of shared technology) and especially system<->user session, e.g. network/wireless management, changes of hardware and hardware states, ...

Only a year ago the OSDL desktop architect meeting 1 started a limited, yet fruitful dialog between commercial ISVs and desktop developers, allowing the later to base their development on actual needs rather than speculations

All in all the last year has been a very positive experience for the desktop projects so I'm confident that they look optimistically into the upcoming one.

Reply Parent Score: 3