Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th Dec 2006 22:24 UTC
Red Hat Red Hat plans to ship the next version of its premium Linux product on February 28, debuting major virtualization technology but missing an earlier deadline by about two months. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 had been scheduled to ship by the end of 2006. However, the company gave itself scheduling wiggle room in September, when Red Hat released the first RHEL 5 beta; a second beta arrived in November.
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screenshots of this beta
by chrishaney on Fri 29th Dec 2006 02:08 UTC
chrishaney
Member since:
2005-11-15

FYI.. shots are available at LinuxQuestions http://shots.linuxquestions.org/index.php?linux_distribution_sm=Red...

Reply Score: 4

RE: screenshots of this beta
by unoengborg on Fri 29th Dec 2006 05:20 in reply to "screenshots of this beta"
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

Looks like FC6.

The desktop will most likely not be the primary target for this release but it's still a pity that they didn't wait for the next Gnome version that will contain some of the usability enhancements that was introduced by Novell. I'm thinking of things like the new "slab" gnome menu. Not that the current Gnome menu is that bad, but nothing beats things that have been tested on real non geek users.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: screenshots of this beta
by sukru on Fri 29th Dec 2006 09:38 in reply to "RE: screenshots of this beta"
sukru Member since:
2006-11-19

Incorporating something that isn't even tested on Fedora would be a great risk for them.

RedHat needs to support their major server releases for at least seven years. Such a move could bring unnecessary support issues, which they smartly avoid.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: screenshots of this beta
by h3rman on Fri 29th Dec 2006 11:11 in reply to "RE: screenshots of this beta"
h3rman Member since:
2006-08-09

... a pity that they didn't wait for the next Gnome version that will contain some of the usability enhancements that was introduced by Novell. I'm thinking of things like the new "slab" gnome menu.

Novell's Gnome menu is not more usable than the present default Gnome menu.
The former actually needs more mouse clicks.
Plus, why sacrifice one window thumbnail/virtual desktop bar? Because virtual desktops are confusing; however it's nice once you know it. Why not explain the nice 'secret' features of Gnome in a KDE style "tip of the day" way?
I may be ostracised for saying this, but if anything, Novell's Gnome menu is an attempt to make Gnome look more like Windows, which is not by definition more usable. It may be good for people that get scared by anything remotely different from Windows, though, if you want to have them use another OS.

Not that the current Gnome menu is that bad, but nothing beats things that have been tested on real non geek users.

Ergonomists know, for starters, that a menu on top of the screen is better. For your neck, for example. So here Novell is making a first, untested I assume, mistake. If these 'tests' on 'non geek users' didn't take efficiency (number of mouse clicks) and ergonomics (menu bar down by default, not smart) into account, and presumed that users should not be told of anything they could not discover for themselves, then this 'test' is already compromised by the fact that most people sort of know how the Windows interface works.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: screenshots of this beta
by thebluesgnr on Fri 29th Dec 2006 10:35 in reply to "screenshots of this beta"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

FYI, those are screenshots of the first beta. The second one is much more polished, and can be downloaded freely as well.

Reply Parent Score: 3