Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 31st Dec 2006 17:26 UTC, submitted by Charles A Landemaine
PC-BSD Just in time for the new year, the PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of PC-BSD version 1.3 for public download. You may download this release and view the change log. The team is also launching a web design contest for the new web site of 2007.
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Doc Pain
Member since:
2006-10-08

"Can the pbi-infrastructure do a system-wide upgrade like "apt-get upgrade", or a database search like "apt-cache search XYZ"? If not, I'll pass, for now."

As mentioned before, the PBI system is for application programs, not for the system itself. As mentioned before as well, you can use the FreeBSD ports collection along with the PBI system.

To upgrade the system, you would do something like this:

# cd /usr/src
# make update
# make buildworld buildkernel
# make installkernel
...

(You can add KERNCONF=MYKERNELNAME to buildkernel / installkernel for a user defined kernel configuration. More information can be taken from the excellent FreeBSD handbook.)

And for the apps, as long as you want to take them from the ports collection, something like this:

# cd /usr/ports
# make update
# pkgdb -aF
# portupgrade -arpRO

This will update all your installed applications.

As it was also mentioned before, it's not a good idea to mix things in PC-BSD. You know, you actually can do it, but the use of the PBI system is recommendet. PBI works fine for average users such as Steven Q. Sixpack and Jane Average. For those of us who like to tweak and patch, the ports collection surely is more fun. :-)

And remember: You can still use the older pkg_* commands, such as:

# pkg_add -r xmms
# pkgdb -aF

With PC-BSD, you have 4 (!) choices about how to install software: PBI, portinstall/portupgrade, (classical) make, pkg_add. But if you concentrate on the PBI system, you'll always be fine.

Back on (main) topic: I've downloaded and tested PC-BSD 1.3. First of all, I don't like KDE very much. :-) Then, the german i18n is not very good (as it always was). Hardware detection works well, mount operations also do. The PC-BSD developers have done a good job. I will surely cdrecord some CD packs and make presents out of them for the many poor people with "Windows" problems I know. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

vegai Member since:
2005-12-25

"With PC-BSD, you have 4 (!) choices about how to install software: PBI, portinstall/portupgrade, (classical) make, pkg_add. But if you concentrate on the PBI system, you'll always be fine. "

If PC-BSD tries to be a sort of "for-dummies" system, having 4 choices as such is a bug, not a feature.

Though perhaps it can be ignored if just using PBI indeed works. But never never tell a non-BSD user that in order to update the system, you need to run three make commands, and then to upgrade the rest, you need a few more commands. Linux people are used to doing all that in a single command.

Edited 2007-01-01 08:42

Reply Parent Score: 1

rapont Member since:
2005-07-06

Though perhaps it can be ignored if just using PBI indeed works. But never never tell a non-BSD user that in order to update the system, you need to run three make commands, and then to upgrade the rest, you need a few more commands. Linux people are used to doing all that in a single command.

LOL - I had a debate with a FreeBSD user friend of mine about this - I kept on asking him why that method was superior to the Linux single command - after a long, long debate he resorted to the sentence "It just is" :-p

The same guy also told me when I was moaning that there should be a simple "security centre" in Ubuntu where you control firewall/antivirus/antispam etc that people who use OSS software don't need security products as the code is so superior and that security software is an MS-only plague. Sad to say - he had been using FreeBSD for years!

Edited 2007-01-01 14:26

Reply Parent Score: 1

Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

But never never tell a non-BSD user that in order to update the system, you need to run three make commands, and then to upgrade the rest, you need a few more commands. Linux people are used to doing all that in a single command.

Where did you read that? People are trolling. It's just not true. To install, say, seamonkey on PC-BSD, you have 3 possibilities:

1. Install the application like on Windows (.pbi file)
2. Install the seamonkey package with: pkg_add -r seamonkey
3. Compile seamonkey from ports: cd /usr/ports/www/seamonkey && make install clean

AFAICT, on Linux you are pretty much limited to apt-get or yum.

one thing that always put me off BSD was the people who use *BSD - they see anyone who uses Linux as an enemy who is just as bad as a Vista user. I think a more accurate statement would be that "BSD fanboi's are 10x worse than Linux ones"

Ok, one more troll. Please show me on a BSD forum a comment that bashes a Linux user. Most BSD users are also Linux users, so your argument doesn't make sense. One of the reason some people leave the Linux community for BSD is precisely because the Linux gurus are pedant and treat n00bs as stupid. You don't see that among the BSD community.

The same guy also told me when I was moaning that there should be a simple "security centre" in Ubuntu where you control firewall/antivirus/antispam etc that people who use OSS software don't need security products as the code is so superior and that security software is an MS-only plague. Sad to say - he had been using FreeBSD for years!

Was he wrong? I doubt he ever dealt with viruses on his FreeBSD box. I think he was only talking about anti-virus which don't make sense on FreeBSD unless if you use it as a mail server. Obviously firewall and antispam are different, any system is affected.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"If PC-BSD tries to be a sort of "for-dummies" system, having 4 choices as such is a bug, not a feature. "

You should have read my posting eintirely without picking a sentence out of the context. The PBI system is the one for "dummies" and it is strongly recommended to use. So the "dummy" does not even know about the choice he could have.

The better educated ones may use other ways than PBI (as I have explained), but they should not do it because of possible side effects. If you know what you're doing and if you are familiar enough with FreeBSD itself, you surely won't use PC-BSD. You would use a "normal" FreeBSD instead.

It's just because PC-BSD is FreeBSD you have these choices. Okay?

"Though perhaps it can be ignored if just using PBI indeed works.

It works, and it works well. In order to upgrade the system itself, the use of the installation CDs (e. g. from 1.2 to 1.3) is a good way.

"But never never tell a non-BSD user that in order to update the system, you need to run three make commands, and then to upgrade the rest, you need a few more commands. "

"The rest"? Please be sure to see the difference between the base system and the installed applications.

"Linux people are used to doing all that in a single command. "

Which command is it? Is it available in all existing Linux distributions in the same way? Could you please tell me the command?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"But never never tell a non-BSD user that in order to update the system, you need to run three make commands, and then to upgrade the rest, you need a few more commands. Linux people are used to doing all that in a single command. "

Funny how I only have to use one command, "pkg_add -u", to upgrade all packages on OpenBSD. As fun as it is to make blanket statements it does not reflect the real world.
It's like if I would say "Linux package management lacks dependency tracking" and basing that "fact" entirely upon my usage of Slackware and extrapolating that to all Linux distros.

Reply Parent Score: 5

arielb Member since:
2006-11-15

I don't think anyone can really say that linux or bsd could ever be easy to use "for dummies". But i think one of the reasons why linux is so popular as a server is because it is the easiest of the desktop unix as well as free. freebsd is of course also free but people want to use the server that they are familiar with from everyday use. Maybe this will change things for bsd server adoption.

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

With PC-BSD, you have 4 (!) choices about how to install software: PBI, portinstall/portupgrade, (classical) make, pkg_add. But if you concentrate on the PBI system, you'll always be fine.

There are only two methods to install applications in FreeBSD:
- via the ports tree
- via binary packages (pkg_add)

There are a bunch of tools in the ports tree that try to make installing things via the ports tree easier (portmanager, portmaster, portupgrade, etc). However, these all work via the two methods listed above.

With PC-BSD, you get a third option, using their .pbi packages.

Do not confuse portupgrade with a "new" way of installing apps. It's just a wrapper app that uses the ports tree for you. If you try to do so, then you will start to believe that there's more than 2 ways to install apps in Debian (via apt/dpkg, compile from source) -- you can't count dpkg, apt-get, aptitude, synaptic, adept, kpackage, etc as different methods of installing apps -- they are just multiple facets of the same thing: installing a .deb.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"Do not confuse portupgrade with a "new" way of installing apps. It's just a wrapper app that uses the ports tree for you."

You're completely right. I stated this in another posting just to avoid this misunderstanding. In a posting much prior to this one, I also stated that tools like portinstall work on the basis of precompiled packages or the FreeBSD ports collection.

The PBI system does not rely on the two mechanisms listed above, so it's really a third method. In this concern, talking about 4 methods (plus portupgrade) sounds confusing, I agree. It's just because portinstall has developed to a widely used and comfortable mechanism to handle both ports and packages. It affords a bit of knowledge, but in some cases it's faster (or at least needs less user interaction) to install software. Just as the classical methods of pkg_add and make install it can run autonomous or even via a cron job. The use of the pkgdb prevents the user from having installed some applications or libraries twice (or more often). So I thought it was worth mentioning it.

But to get back on topic, the PBI system should be the preferred method in PC-BSD to install software, just as the developers of PC-BSD noted.

Reply Parent Score: 2