Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 31st Dec 2006 17:26 UTC, submitted by Charles A Landemaine
PC-BSD Just in time for the new year, the PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of PC-BSD version 1.3 for public download. You may download this release and view the change log. The team is also launching a web design contest for the new web site of 2007.
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Doc Pain
Member since:
2006-10-08

First of all, you're completely right. But I'd like to make a few additions:

"To install, say, seamonkey on PC-BSD, you have 3 possibilities:

1. Install the application like on Windows (.pbi file)
2. Install the seamonkey package with: pkg_add -r seamonkey
3. Compile seamonkey from ports: cd /usr/ports/www/seamonkey && make install clean"


Oh, you have one more, so 4 (!) possibilities, namely portinstall / portupgrade. To be technically exactly, portinstall can do what no. 2 and 3 do, but it also cares about the package database integrity. Looking at no. 2 and 3, you should run

# pkgdb -aF

before and after, just for security.

portinstall can a) compile from source or b) use a precompiled package. It can also create a precompiled package from waht you just compiled from source. (I use this way to compile a bunch of applications once and then having precompiled packages to add on another system.)

This will install seamonkey from source:

# portinstall seamonkey

(You can add -p to have the precompiled package stored in /usr/ports/packages/.)

This will install seamonkey from a precompiled package, which is fetched automatically:

# portinstall -P seamonkey

(You can use -PP instead of -P to use such packages only, especially for dependencies.)

For more information and examples, please refer to "man portinstall".

And to upgrade to a newer version of seamonkey, you would do this:

# portupgrade seamonkey

(Use additional options as desired.)

But as I said before, the use of the PBI system is recommended. Novice users should always use it until they really know what they do.

So what's the problem here? Surely, no problem.

As a comment: My neighbour uses PC-BSD for half a year now and he's happy with it. He has no problems using the PBI system, it works fine for him. He doesn't even feel the need to install applications with pkg_add, portinstall or make. If I may say it this way, he's a computer illiterate; the PC-BSD workstation is his first own system - and he loves it. I'll give him the 1.3 installation discs soon after doing a data backup via LAN.

"AFAICT, on Linux you are pretty much limited to apt-get or yum."

What about YaST? Or am I mixing up things here? (I have to excuse, I don't use Linux on a daily basis.)

Most BSD users are also Linux users, so your argument doesn't make sense. One of the reason some people leave the Linux community for BSD is precisely because the Linux gurus are pedant and treat n00bs as stupid. You don't see that among the BSD community."

Can confirm.

"I doubt he ever dealt with viruses on his FreeBSD box. "

Same here. :-)

"I think he was only talking about anti-virus which don't make sense on FreeBSD unless if you use it as a mail server."

That's correct. If you're running a mail server, you have to be careful about proper administration. If you're running just a simple workstation, you usually won't encounter any problems with PC-BSD. The firewall settings (ipfw) are good by default. Spam is a problem in your INBOX where you can apply the proper rules in your favourite mail client. And viruses... I don't need to say anything. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 4

antik Member since:
2006-05-19

The firewall settings (ipfw) are good by default.

Correction: PC-BSD got PF (OpenBSD Packet Filter) as default, autogenerated, firewall. We have firewall gui in our roadmap for 1.4 release, so any ideas and feature requests are welcome.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"Correction: PC-BSD got PF (OpenBSD Packet Filter) as default, autogenerated, firewall."

Ah sorry, my mistake. PC-BSD 1.2 was using ipfw by default. OpenBSD's pf is avaiable for FreeBSD since version... 5... in... 2001? So it's great it got integrated in PC-BSD 1.3. Great work!

Reply Parent Score: 2

Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

Yeah there are some really stupid comments and misconceptions about BSD in this thread...

Too bad. I don't understand why so many Linux users dislike BSD. It's such a nicely designed system. We should all accept each other and accept each other's choice, be it Linux, BSD or Windows, and stop lying.

Reply Parent Score: 5

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The portupgrade suite of tools is not part of the base OS. Anyone who chooses to use them has taken it upon themselves to use that method. Hence, there are only three official methods to install applications in PC-BSD (2 in standard FreeBSD).

Note also that the "package database" you discuss is a portupgrade-only feature, and is not part of the base OS. The FreeBSD ports tree uses /var/db/pkg/* to store installed app info. *ONLY* portupgrade uses /var/db/pkg/pkgdb and /usr/ports/INDEX.db.

The canonical ways to install applications in FreeBSD are:
- via the ports tree
- via packages (pkg_add)

Any other methods that a user chooses to use is at their discretion and their (possible) peril.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"The portupgrade suite of tools is not part of the base OS. "

That's right. The port / package "portupgrade" has to be installed, it offers tools such as pkg_deinstall, pkg_fetch, pkg_glob, ports_glob, pkg_sort, pkg_which, portversion, portinstall or pkgdb. In order to combine it with "make update" (also used for ports operations) "cvsup" has to be installed. So one could say, the updating mechanism via cvsup is not part of the base OS as well.

"Note also that the "package database" you discuss is a portupgrade-only feature, and is not part of the base OS. The FreeBSD ports tree uses /var/db/pkg/* to store installed app info. *ONLY* portupgrade uses /var/db/pkg/pkgdb and /usr/ports/INDEX.db."

That's correct as well. The INDEX.db mechanism is utilized when doing something like make seach name="foo". To build the INDEX.db, it has to be fetched (make fetchindex) or built (make index), if I remember correctly.

So it's worth to say that incorrect use of both packaging system may cause the system to have multiple instances of one port / package installed. To avoid this, one should be careful and use "pkgdb -aF". The proper use of pkg_delete and make deinstall is implied hereby; but as I remember, the installing mechanisms have respective warnings to prevent such multiple installations (such as "package is already installed").

"The canonical ways to install applications in FreeBSD are:
- via the ports tree
- via packages (pkg_add)"


If portinstall is used without the -p switch, it works the first way; if -P or -PP is specified, it goes the second one. So it's not a "real" third method to install applications. As you noted well, its speciality is the pkgdb.

"Any other methods that a user chooses to use is at their discretion and their (possible) peril."

Just as I said.

Reply Parent Score: 2