Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Jan 2007 23:34 UTC
Windows As part of his keynote address on Sunday at the annual Consumer Electronics Show, Gates showed off Windows Home Server (more info at Ars) - a consumer device to serve as a central storage place for digital photos, music and other media. The first products are due out later this year from HP and others. The goal is to get devices that can cost less than USD 500. In the first of a two-part interview, Microsoft's chairman talks about why the average person wants a server, why they won't need a degree in computer science to run it and what hurdles remain before consumers reach the true digital home.
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RE[6]: Market?
by mallard on Tue 9th Jan 2007 01:58 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Market?"
mallard
Member since:
2006-01-06

"Average user" has nothing to do with it, they have no need or desire for a server. Most of them only have one PC, if they want backup, a USB pen or external hard drive would serve just as well.

I re-iterate: I see no need for "Joe Average" to have a "home server". There is a strong correlation between those that want/need this sort of thing and those that could set it up.

I meant to connect via USB to the server (I thought that was obvious). Even connecting it internally is a simple matter of following the instructions that are generally provided with hard drives or are easily found on Google.

In that time, you could be well on your way backing up your systems with WHS.

If someone put together a specialized Linux distro for this sort of thing, which I'm sure they will if it takes off, the set-up time could be reduced to a few minutes (using a LiveCD-based approach). The backup is nothing special, nothing that a cron job or "Scheduled task" couldn't do.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Market?
by n4cer on Tue 9th Jan 2007 02:20 in reply to "RE[6]: Market?"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

If someone put together a specialized Linux distro for this sort of thing, which I'm sure they will if it takes off, the set-up time could be reduced to a few minutes (using a LiveCD-based approach). The backup is nothing special, nothing that a cron job or "Scheduled task" couldn't do.

And who will market this specialized distro so that average users can buy a box, plug it in, walk through a few configuration steps, and be done? A cron job or scheduled task would likely take more time and disk space for the backup, and backup is still only one aspect of WHS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Free Linux NAS solution
by nedvis on Tue 9th Jan 2007 05:02 in reply to "RE[7]: Market?"
nedvis Member since:
2006-01-02

Turn any PC into a NAS

Use NASLite to configure a dedicated storage server
in less than five minutes

http://www.pcquest.com/content/linux/2005/105041201.asp

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Market?
by Bit_Rapist on Tue 9th Jan 2007 03:14 in reply to "RE[6]: Market?"
Bit_Rapist Member since:
2005-11-13

I re-iterate: I see no need for "Joe Average" to have a "home server".

At one time certain execs at HP thought there was no need for the average person at home to even have a computer. We all see how accurate that one turned out to be!

Joe User already has a server at home, a lot of people are sharing out music and videos over their home LAN using shared folders etc.

The fact that routers have become common place in the home shows that joe user is capable of learning and connecting the dots when the package is fairly straightforward.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: Market?
by Coxy on Tue 9th Jan 2007 11:16 in reply to "RE[7]: Market?"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

What planet have you been living on? Routers are not common place. Maybe in American Sitcoms where everyone no matter what his job is (be a Street Cleaner or Mechanic) has a three storey House with seven bed rooms and PC's in every children's room from the age of two years old.

Some people who aren't geeks actually do things with their friends and family. Like, go out, talk, cook (meaning to really cook something not having an instant ready meal or sauce). They don't use Playstations or let their children use them... I'm sure even in the US Bill g can find some people like that.

Bill has obviously never lived in the real world... probably stuck in his huge house to afraid to go out because of rogue pies... and has seen to much Tv and thought that's how people really live. Or maybe he just spent to long reading comments from girlfriendless, childless posters on interne forums who assume that parents will want to let their children sit in front of computers, g

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Market?
by Coxy on Tue 9th Jan 2007 11:18 in reply to "RE[7]: Market?"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

What planet have you been living on? Routers are not common place. Maybe in American Sitcoms where everyone no matter what his job is (be a Street Cleaner or Mechanic) has a three storey House with seven bed rooms and PC's in every children's room from the age of two years old.

Some people who aren't geeks actually do things with their friends and family. Like, go out, talk, cook (meaning to really cook something not having an instant ready meal or sauce). They don't use Playstations or let their children use them... I'm sure even in the US Bill g can find some people like that.

Bill has obviously never lived in the real world... probably stuck in his huge house to afraid to go out because of rogue pies... and has seen to much Tv and thought that's how people really live. Or maybe he just spent to long reading comments from girlfriendless, childless posters on internet forums who assume that parents will want to let their children sit in front of computers all day gaming

Reply Parent Score: 1