Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Jan 2007 23:34 UTC
Windows As part of his keynote address on Sunday at the annual Consumer Electronics Show, Gates showed off Windows Home Server (more info at Ars) - a consumer device to serve as a central storage place for digital photos, music and other media. The first products are due out later this year from HP and others. The goal is to get devices that can cost less than USD 500. In the first of a two-part interview, Microsoft's chairman talks about why the average person wants a server, why they won't need a degree in computer science to run it and what hurdles remain before consumers reach the true digital home.
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RE[8]: It's a good idea...
by Rayz on Tue 9th Jan 2007 14:11 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: It's a good idea..."
Rayz
Member since:
2006-06-24

I know you're a die-hard MS supporter, but that doesn't change the fact that MS has a hard time penetrating new markets,

It's not a new market though is it? It's an extension of a market that they pretty much own; home users. Can't see how a Linux-based solution is going to get around that. If Linux was making any headway on the home desktop, then it would have a chance.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: It's a good idea...
by archiesteel on Tue 9th Jan 2007 14:41 in reply to "RE[8]: It's a good idea..."
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

It's an extension of a market that they pretty much own; home users.

No, it's an extension of a market where they are just one of many players: servers.

Can't see how a Linux-based solution is going to get around that.

That's because your pro-MS bias is keeping you from seeing the big picture: it doesn't matter what the NAS device runs. All it needs to do is communicate with the Windows clients, and guess what? Linux already does that.

If Linux was making any headway on the home desktop, then it would have a chance.

That's completely irrelevant. Note that such a NAS device doesn't even have to run Linux. It could run one of the BSDs, or Solaris (or even OS X if Apple decided to put one out). Of course, using a FOSS OS would mean lower costs for the manufacturer, increasing profits (and providing stiff competition for MS).

What do you think runs all those Linksys hardware routers you find everywhere? That's right. Linux.

Thanks for playing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: It's a good idea...
by Rayz on Tue 9th Jan 2007 19:50 in reply to "RE[9]: It's a good idea..."
Rayz Member since:
2006-06-24

No, it's an extension of a market where they are just one of many players: servers.

Yes, I see your problem.
You believe marketing is about technology; that's the kind of thinking that nearly killed Apple and caused Vista to hit the skids a few years back.
Here's a clue, marketing is about people. There is no market for servers, there is a market made up of folk who have more than one PC in their home, who want to share their videos, photos and music, want to have the whole lot backed up without any fuss or complication, want to access their machines remotely.

Now can you tell me which Linux solution can be set up for desktop remoting, versioned backups that will allow the kids to just point at a version of the file they want and restore it, backup a set of PCs automatically, allow the addition of extra disks to a virtual pool at a click of mouse and allow whole machines to be restored within an hour from smart backups that only record the different files between various machines AND can be set up and run by my gran?

That's because your pro-MS bias is keeping you from seeing the big picture:

Rule Number 76743394:112 from the Anyone But MS handbook - As soon as you see your argument collapsing, immediately throw out the 'MS-bias' argument. With any luck, this is a winning strategy for a number of reasons:

1. While the other party is floored by your deep, almost Jedi-like insight into his psyche, you can read up and do some more research to find that Linux-based solution that almost fits the bill. And remember, even if you have to research two dozen command line incantations to make it work, you must insist that your mother could do it, and it will ten time better than the 'MS' solution. And don't forget the '$'; that reinforces the idea that Microsoft is in fact, the anti-christ.


2. If number 1 fails, then you may get lucky; the other party may feel so insulted that the whole thread descends into a slanging match, and everyone will forget that your argument was failing.

3. If number 2 fails, then persist with the 'MS bias' accusations in the hope that other ABMers will join in and help you out.


Sorry about that; trying to improve my touch-typing speed; let's move on shall we?

it doesn't matter what the NAS device runs. All it needs to do is communicate with the Windows clients, and guess what? Linux already does that.

Yes, but could Joe Public be bothered to set up this kind of functionality on a Linux system? And it's not just a matter of backing up. What's involved in setting up automatic backups, securing folders, remote desktops, versioning, checks to make sure Johnny hasn't turned off the firewall on his Windows PC?


If Linux was making any headway on the home desktop, then it would have a chance.

That's completely irrelevant.


Not really. Because this will be much more successful than any Linux based solution for much the same reason that Windows continues to be more successful than Linux on the desktop; MS makes the effort to understand the needs of the home user. Once the Linux folk get that, then we'll see some real competition on the desktop.

I mean would it be so hard to say 'right, let's just focus on ONE distro and market the hell out of it. Let's all work together and tell Joe Public that this is the universal Linux.'

???

Sorry, I'm drifting.


Note that such a NAS device doesn't even have to run Linux. It could run one of the BSDs, or Solaris (or even OS X if Apple decided to put one out). Of course, using a FOSS OS would mean lower costs for the manufacturer, increasing profits (and providing stiff competition for MS).


Yeah, but even though you are desperately trying to ignore th fact; this is much more than a NAS device.

What do you think runs all those Linksys hardware routers you find everywhere? That's right. Linux.

So, you're comparing the functionality of this thing, to a router?

Ooookaay, but my router doesn't actually do ... well, you've seen the list.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: It's a good idea...
by ma_d on Tue 9th Jan 2007 20:32 in reply to "RE[8]: It's a good idea..."
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually TMK Linux is already here... Your DVR, your network storage device and your router are somewhat likely to be running a customized linux.
It's just not there by branding, which is what Microsoft is shooting for. Linux, instead, is hidden behind the brand. Also, these devices are only now beginning to get popular.
And Microsoft wants you to buy general pc hardware to do this instead of custom hardware for the job (usually designed to only do what's needed and nothing more for cost purposes where Microsoft likely hopes to beat the prices by simple mass production driven by mass marketing and strong brand support).

Reply Parent Score: 2