Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 9th Jan 2007 20:47 UTC, submitted by ciaran
GNU, GPL, Open Source "The following is a transcript of a lecture given by Richard Stallman in Zagreb (Croatia/Hrvatska) on March 9th 2006. The lecture was given in English. Richard Stallman launched the GNU project in 1983, and with it the Free Software movement. Stallman is the president of FSF - a sister organisation of FSFE. Transcription of this presentation was undertaken by Ciarán O'Riordan."
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doh!
by Bounty on Wed 10th Jan 2007 17:57 UTC
Bounty
Member since:
2006-09-18

OK dude is soooooooo wrong. full of it...

" Q3c: But they released only binaries.

Richard Stallman: Oh, well then they're violating the licence. The developers need to talk to a lawyer, and you can sue them. "

So all of the sudden when someone violates HIS license it's unethical. Even though those programmers are helping by releasing something usefull! To me that's like suing someone because they showed you a trick, but didn't tell you how it works.

Reply Score: 2

RE: doh!
by tomcat on Wed 10th Jan 2007 21:51 in reply to "doh!"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

So all of the sudden when someone violates HIS license it's unethical. Even though those programmers are helping by releasing something usefull! To me that's like suing someone because they showed you a trick, but didn't tell you how it works.

That's the problem with zealots and radicals: They're always willing to ascribe greater freedom to their way of thinking, unless and until you attempt to apply their own methods and thoughts to their own turf.

Stallman's concept of freedom rests not on the freedom to use software but, rather, on the preservation of his own ideology; that is, preventing commercial software from leveraging and eclipsing free software. That is not freedom, in my opinion. I don't care about his ideology. I care about writing code. To me, the greater freedom would be to get code and do whatever I want with it, regardless of the ideology of people who want to control it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: doh!
by cyclops on Wed 10th Jan 2007 22:31 in reply to "RE: doh!"
cyclops Member since:
2006-03-12

"That's the problem with zealots and radicals: They're always willing to ascribe greater freedom to their way of thinking, unless and until you attempt to apply their own methods and thoughts to their own turf."

Eh? I'm confused.

"Stallman's concept of freedom rests not on the freedom to use software but, rather, on the preservation of his own ideology; that is, preventing commercial software from leveraging and eclipsing free software. That is not freedom, in my opinion. I don't care about his ideology. I care about writing code. To me, the greater freedom would be to get code and do whatever I want with it, regardless of the ideology of people who want to control it."

Eh?

What on earth are you on about, seriously I've read it about 10 times. I'm absolutely certain that if you write code you can do whatever you want with it.

Licence it however you want; re-license it; let it sit on your hard drive; put it in a skip.

Unless your talking about making a change to *someone else's code*

Reply Parent Score: 3