Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 9th Jan 2007 20:47 UTC, submitted by ciaran
GNU, GPL, Open Source "The following is a transcript of a lecture given by Richard Stallman in Zagreb (Croatia/Hrvatska) on March 9th 2006. The lecture was given in English. Richard Stallman launched the GNU project in 1983, and with it the Free Software movement. Stallman is the president of FSF - a sister organisation of FSFE. Transcription of this presentation was undertaken by Ciarán O'Riordan."
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RE[5]: Nice philosophy...
by Cloudy on Wed 10th Jan 2007 18:54 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Nice philosophy..."
Cloudy
Member since:
2006-02-15

Actually yes. There are too many of the "free as in beer" crowd. I'll check into the 50% bit, but I have yet to actually meet anyone that gets paid for working on OSS projects. I know some that contribute when they can, but do not know a single one that gets paid for what they work on. 50% would indicate 1 out of every 2.

IBM pays, at last count, about 1200 people to work on OSS projects, mostly Linux related. HP has about 300. MontaVista is an entire company of people paid, in part, to work on OSS projects. I have been paid to work on OSS projects. Linus, of course, is currently paid to work on OSS projects. RMS has, at times, been paid to work on OSS projects. GCC is currently mostly maintained by CodeSourcery, a company which exists by working on OSS projects. Did I mention RedHat and Novell both pay people to work full time on OSS projects? Ubuntu is developed by people paid to work full time on OSS projects.

Attend the next Ottawa Linux Symposium. You will be unable to turn around without encountering people who are paid to work on OSS projects.

I don't have hard numbers, but I would guess, based on an unscientific survey of source forge, that there's a very high correlation between an OSS project's success and the percent of the work done by people paid to work on it.

And that's before you count all of the people who work on these projects on their employer's time without formal permission but with tacit approval.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[6]: Nice philosophy...
by DrillSgt on Wed 10th Jan 2007 19:07 in reply to "RE[5]: Nice philosophy..."
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"IBM pays, at last count, about 1200 people to work on OSS projects, mostly Linux related. HP has about 300. MontaVista is an entire company of people paid, in part, to work on OSS projects. I have been paid to work on OSS projects. Linus, of course, is currently paid to work on OSS projects. RMS has, at times, been paid to work on OSS projects. GCC is currently mostly maintained by CodeSourcery, a company which exists by working on OSS projects. Did I mention RedHat and Novell both pay people to work full time on OSS projects? Ubuntu is developed by people paid to work full time on OSS projects."

Okay, that is more then I thought. Which brings the count to about 10000 or so paid to develop OSS worldwide. Still small in the scheme of things. I had mentioned Ubuntu (Canonical), Redhat and Suse (Novell) in my post. I was not aware of IBM working on OSS projects, though I know they do Websphere, Tivoli and such, none of which is OSS, but it does run on OSS platforms. Either way that is a rather small number of developers getting paid compared to the number of developers out there. Current estimates for worldwide software developers are at 15 Million.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Nice philosophy...
by schiesbn on Wed 10th Jan 2007 20:34 in reply to "RE[6]: Nice philosophy..."
schiesbn Member since:
2006-03-30

The Boston Consulting Group has made a study about Free Software development and found out that about 40% of the Free Software is developed by professionals during their work. This was 2002 i think today the number would be even higher. Just look at all the companies mentioned by Cloudy and there are much more SMBs and SMEs. Or think about Sun and OpenOffice, Open Solaris and OpenJDK. Think about Nokia and their new handhelds etc. Even Microsoft is doing some Free Software (FlexWiki, Windows Installer XML, Windows Template Library).

Edited 2007-01-10 20:40

Reply Parent Score: 3