Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 11th Jan 2007 22:46 UTC, submitted by jayson.knight
Windows A senior Microsoft executive says the company is concerned that uncertified third-party software loaded onto new computers by manufacturers could hurt the launch of consumer versions of its Windows Vista operating system later this month. In a discussion Tuesday night at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the Microsoft official told CBC News Online, on condition of anonymity, that the world's largest software maker is frustrated by legal shackles that prevent the company from restricting what kinds of software major computer makers install on new PCs. "We can't do anything about it because it would be illegal," the executive said in reference to restrictions placed on the company following a U.S. federal anti-trust lawsuit against the company.
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RE: Fate of a CLosed System
by stabilep on Fri 12th Jan 2007 12:07 UTC in reply to "Fate of a CLosed System"
stabilep
Member since:
2006-04-02

Please a poorly written program is a poorly written program. It has nothing to do with the OS.

If someone has weatherbug preinstalled and then their system slows down its probably because weatherbug is a horribly written piece of trash with more spaghetti in it then an italian restaurant serving a 1st grade class. Same for Norton. And Dell said that they would sell someone a PC without bloatware on it for $60 more.

Firefox and OpenOffice are not usually preinstalled because no one pays the OEM's to preinstall it so I doubt MS is grouping that under "Craplets"

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Fate of a CLosed System
by cyclops on Fri 12th Jan 2007 13:04 in reply to "RE: Fate of a CLosed System"
cyclops Member since:
2006-03-12

*Firefox and OpenOffice are not usually preinstalled because no one pays the OEM's to preinstall it so I doubt MS is grouping that under "Craplets"*

Microsoft want rights to say what a company can or can't supply with its OS. Those same rights would include Firefox and OpenOffice.

I suspect if they get the power to do this, you will see Microsoft Certified Programs(sic) or Programs from Microsoft Registered Partners(sic) etc etc.

Reply Parent Score: 2