Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 26th Jan 2007 14:55 UTC, submitted by da_Chicken
Debian and its clones "The Dunc-Tank project has been the topic of much debate in the Debian community since it was launched in September last year. Aimed at overcoming Debian's notorious delays in meeting its scheduled releases, Dunc-Tank collected donations to test the effect of funding on open-source software development. It has now been more than a month since the scheduled release of Debian 4.0, codenamed etch. However, even with Dunc-Tank's funding, etch is yet to be seen. Liz Tay speaks with Debian Project Leader and Dunc-Tank mastermind Anthony Towns to find out what happened."
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Too chaotic
by CapEnt on Fri 26th Jan 2007 17:29 UTC
CapEnt
Member since:
2005-12-18

The main problem with Debian is not (only) funding, but their too chaotic development process who make impossible to create any sort of reliable schedule.

Strangely, if this is a advantage or not, i don't know. Gentoo apparently is quite chaotic too, but don't appear to have any serious issues with this. And Debian 'Unstable' branch is in fact quite stable, enough even for some production systems.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Too chaotic
by garymax on Fri 26th Jan 2007 22:53 in reply to "Too chaotic "
garymax Member since:
2006-01-23

"Gentoo apparently is quite chaotic too, but don't appear to have any serious issues with this..."

With Gentoo it isn't much of an issue of how chaotic they are because they are constantly upgrading the system and have "rolling releases" where your system is upgraded in place. You keep up with the latest as you want. There are no point releases per se.

So, chaotic or not, Gentoo isn't affected by their development process as much as Debian is with their point releases.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Too chaotic
by twenex on Sat 27th Jan 2007 18:51 in reply to "RE: Too chaotic "
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

"Gentoo apparently is quite chaotic too, but don't appear to have any serious issues with this..."

With Gentoo it isn't much of an issue of how chaotic they are because they are constantly upgrading the system and have "rolling releases" where your system is upgraded in place. You keep up with the latest as you want. There are no point releases per se.

So, chaotic or not, Gentoo isn't affected by their development process as much as Debian is with their point releases.


You're forgetting that Gentoo also make releases that can be put on a LiveCD about twice a year (currently, I believe the relevant release is 2006.1, which as they start from .0 is the second '06 release). It's only after you install the system that the "rolling release" comes into play - which as I understand it happens with debian-testing and -unstable too. For example, I started with 2004.1, but I'm downloading a new portage tree right now. However, I've no idea how much it's changed from 2006.1 since I never used that install medium, and it's quite possible that by the time I have finished emerging what I want from my new portage tree, I will have some stuff still around from 2004.1 alongside the latest stuff.

I suspect a lot of the differences between Gentoo and Debian emerge (if you'll excuse the pun) because Gentoo, though it has a large number of packages, has a smaller number than Debian. Also, Debian's releases are composed of (potentially) all of the software available for Debian at the time of release, whereas the packages on Gentoo's prebuilt package CD represent only a subset of everything available.

Reply Parent Score: 2