Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 27th Jan 2007 02:07 UTC
Mac OS X A report from wireless industry analyst firm ABI Research released today proclaims that the new Apple iPhone does not fall within the firm's standard definition of a smartphone, due to restrictions Apple has placed on the phone against the inclusion of [native] third-party applications.
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phoehne
Member since:
2006-08-26

Normally phones run two CPUs. One controls the radio and the other runs the crapplications that most phones ship with. That allows you to prevent even ill-behaved java apps from bringing down the network. It's a shame Apple isn't opening up the phone to 3rd party apps. It makes me wonder if their ability to isolate applications from the radio hardware is sufficiently robust. Or maybe, because of some of the neat features like random access voicemail, they weren't able to strongly isolate the radio.

It's a shame especially because that touch control might make for some great phone games. Regardless of what it's called, I'll probably get one.

Edited 2007-01-27 02:56

Reply Score: 5

mahoney Member since:
2006-01-12

Not really, both WinMo and Symbian can run on single core configurations. I am pretty certain that most of the latest Nokia S60 phones (v3+) are all single core.

Reply Parent Score: 3

phoehne Member since:
2006-08-26

It's been a while since I developed for phones, but according to the info I used to get from RIM and Nokia, the second CPU is not accessible to you. It's a dedicated, single CPU that manages the radio and that's it. It's not really a single/dual core issue. It's as if the radio is own embedded device within the phone.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zuschlag Member since:
2006-03-09

Security is not normally the reason for a dual-processor approach to smartphone design rather that the real-time requirements of the baseband and protocol stack. Until recently neither Symbian nor Windows Mobile (or what they call it this week) have had sufficient real-time capabilities in order to meet these requirements thus the reason for adding a extra "application" processor. It is correct that Symbian with the introduction of their second generation kernel (EK2) provided the groundwork for a single processor solution, however I'm not aware if any of the phones currently on the market are single processor.

Reply Parent Score: 3

phoehne Member since:
2006-08-26

I got that from a talk by the Nokia stooge (err. spokesman) at a wireless conference I went to a couple of years back. I guess post 9/11 the talking point was security, but he meant - develop away - you can't hurt the phone or the network. Then, I went to a security talk where (he he he) they covered just that topic.

Reply Parent Score: 2