Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 1st Feb 2007 01:12 UTC, submitted by jayson.knight
Microsoft After 17 years with the company, Jim Allchin retired from Microsoft as of Jan. 30, 2007 the day on which Microsoft officially released the Windows Vista operating system to consumers. James (Jim) Allchin served as co-president of Microsoft's Platforms & Services Division from September 2005 until his retirement. In that position, Allchin shared overall responsibility with Kevin Johnson for the division of the company that includes the Windows and Windows Live Group, Windows Live Platform Group, Online Business Group, Market Expansion Group, Core Operating System Division, Windows Client Marketing Group, Developer and Platform Evangelism Group, and the Server and Tools Business Group.
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RE: Gates and now Allchin
by Fennec_Fox on Thu 1st Feb 2007 01:42 UTC in reply to "Gates and now Allchin"
Fennec_Fox
Member since:
2006-10-30

Windows is still very strong, a new version just came out... May be he knows something that we don't, but right now it looks like he has a very good resume ;)

Edited 2007-02-01 01:43

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Gates and now Allchin
by twenex on Thu 1st Feb 2007 01:56 in reply to "RE: Gates and now Allchin"
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

Windows is still very strong,

If Windows were forced to compete on its own merits it would be a dismal failure. PC operating systems are a one party state.

a new version just came out...

Yeah, and not only does nobody care, but also "Windows Live" is being "hurt by weak branding".

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Gates and now Allchin
by kaiwai on Thu 1st Feb 2007 10:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Gates and now Allchin"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

If Windows were forced to compete on its own merits it would be a dismal failure. PC operating systems are a one party state.

It does compete and given that the alternatives have terrible hardware support, and there is a complete dearth of application support on non-Microsoft platforms like Linux, is there any wonder for Microsoft's monopoly.

People will start moving once they can run the same applications they have now, but in native linux form, on Linux; until that day, people will be forced to run Windows because of the ability to run the applications they like rather than it being anything to do with any so-called love of the Windows operating system.

Yeah, and not only does nobody care, but also "Windows Live" is being "hurt by weak branding".

How about a better and more to the point explaination; Windows Live sucks - plain and simple; Microsoft left it too late to deliver their services online, their Live content is too American focused - clue to Microsoft, the world doesn't revolve around the US of A, no matter how ignorant the general populace at Microsoft headquarters maybe.

Add that to the fact that Google provides a much better experience than what Microsoft can provide; is there any surprised? Google's search is more accurate and faster, their email service is snappy and not loaded with tonnes of ads and crap.

Something Microsoft fails to realise is just that, people want to use the service; if they keep pissing the end user off with constant barrage of crap from advertisements and requesting 'feedback', the end user will simply give up and go to the superior provider; and given how easy it is to move from one provider to another, its going to be difficult to lock people in.

Edited 2007-02-01 11:01

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Gates and now Allchin
by tomcat on Thu 1st Feb 2007 02:22 in reply to "RE: Gates and now Allchin"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

If Windows were forced to compete

Yeah, if gravity didn't exist, you'd be able to fly, too. As if.

Reply Parent Score: 1