Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 2nd Feb 2007 11:30 UTC, submitted by anonymous
Novell and Ximian When Novell and Microsoft announced their unlikely partnership, a part of the arrangement that got little attention at the time was that they'd create a joint research facility, where both company's technical experts would collaborate on new joint software solutions. Now, they're staffing up.
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RE: ms/novell
by walterbyrd on Fri 2nd Feb 2007 13:01 UTC in reply to "ms/novell"
walterbyrd
Member since:
2005-12-31

The deal is a scam, designed to kill Linux. No way in hell will msft help linux. If msft honestly wanted to interoperate, all msft ever had to do, was do so. No suspecious, secretive, deal was ever required.

If msft wants to interoperate, then why is msft fighting ODF so hard? Msft is scared to death of ODF - why is that? Why is msft fighting interoperability with Samba? Why is msft fighting against the established mp3 and jpg standards? Figure it out, it's not hard.

> I would love to see one day Ms release a version of MS Office for Suse Enterprise Linux.

You won't.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: ms/novell
by kaiwai on Fri 2nd Feb 2007 18:28 in reply to "RE: ms/novell"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

And how is licencing and paying a fee for Mp3 any less evil than having to do the same thing with wma/wmv? considering that wma/wmv are merely mpeg4 derivatives, I don't quite understand the purpose of your anti-Microsoft agenda.

For me, I use neither, I prefer using ogg and other technologies that don't crush me, and my ability to move to other operating systems easily.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ms/novell
by zztaz on Fri 2nd Feb 2007 20:24 in reply to "RE[2]: ms/novell"
zztaz Member since:
2006-09-16

The MPEG cartel wants to have a monopoly over multimedia formats, and that's legal. If they succeed because they offer the best combination of technology and license terms, that's fine.

Microsoft wants the same thing, and is free to compete for it on the same terms. But there's a catch.

Microsoft controls the dominant desktop, to the point where they have monopoly power. That's legal. But they can't use control of the desktop to gain control over new monopolies.

Monopolies aren't illegal. Abuse of the power of a monopoly is. The MPEG cartel didn't use some other monopoly to make their formats popular. They competed.

My agenda is to counter abuse of power, and abuse of monopoly power in particular. Microsoft has a lot of power, and a history of abusing it. I'm not anti-Microsoft, I'm anti-abuse. I'm opposed to certain actions by Microsoft or any other company. I give Microsoft credit where credit is deserved, and scorn where scorn is deserved.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ms/novell
by segedunum on Fri 2nd Feb 2007 19:27 in reply to "RE: ms/novell"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

And how is licencing and paying a fee for Mp3 any less evil than having to do the same thing with wma/wmv? considering that wma/wmv are merely mpeg4 derivatives

Windows Media is a proprietary technology. End of story.

For me, I use neither, I prefer using ogg and other technologies that don't crush me, and my ability to move to other operating systems easily.

Which you can't do with Windows Media, which was his point. Microsoft doesn't want you moving or interoperating, which is why they're so against doing anything with ODF.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: ms/novell
by kaiwai on Sat 3rd Feb 2007 01:07 in reply to "RE[3]: ms/novell"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Windows Media is a proprietary technology. End of story.

And you can licence that very technology, just like you can licence MPEG technology as well - TurboLinux is a prime example of a vendor who has licenced Microsoft technology in the form of WMA and WMV support.

How is Microsofts 'proprietary technologies' any worse than any of the other vendors? I mean, atleast you can *licence* these technologies; I mean, sure, bash them if they kept it all to themselves, but they've allowed people to licence the technology if they wanted it.

Reply Parent Score: 2