Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 9th Feb 2007 23:04 UTC, submitted by Dolores Parker
Linux Yesterday, Linspire and Canonical issued a joint announcement that Linspire would begin to base its distributions on Ubuntu rather than Debian, and that Ubuntu users would be able to use CNR to install proprietary applications and drivers, starting with the Fiesty Fawn release. Linspire is just the latest distro to switch from Debian to Ubuntu, though it may be the highest-profile distribution to do so. Are other distros in talks with Canonical? Steve George, Canonical's director of support and services, says that Canonical is in talks with other vendors, and says, "I think you'll see some announcements next week about other people using us as a platform."
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Yes!
by BSDrama on Fri 9th Feb 2007 23:17 UTC
BSDrama
Member since:
2006-11-27

There's great potential in this. This could be the tipping point for Linux. Being honest, as a fairly new *NIX user I can tell you guys that most people don't want to be bothered with the console or, in the case of BSD, with ports. And although Synaptic is a fairly good option, nothing beats double clicking on an icon to install software.

Standardization IS the way to go. This could very well be a historical announcement. I'm stoked.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Yes!
by jessta on Sat 10th Feb 2007 04:59 in reply to "Yes!"
jessta Member since:
2005-08-17

People don't want to be bothered with the console because they are coming from a windows world where everything is about buttons. They never learned to use the console and so never know how much easier many tasks are when you use it.

Coming from a number of years of using many package management tool I'd say there is nothing worse than 'double clicking an icon to install software'. It's a huge effort to install software like that.

1. Go to website and find program installer
2. Download program installer
3. Find downloaded program installer and double click
4. Go through many configuration windows
5. repeat for each program you wish to install.

apt-get, emerge, yum etc. are so much easier and less effort.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Yes!
by yak8998 on Mon 12th Feb 2007 04:44 in reply to "RE: Yes!"
yak8998 Member since:
2006-07-28

general users like the GUI interface better though. The command line is too archaic. And yes, it can be easier for a lot of things, but that is once you finally learn it. Your average user does not want to put in the effort to learn the intricacies of bash when they can just point and click a few times. windows originally captured market share because it was so simple (still is really)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Yes!
by B. Janssen on Sun 11th Feb 2007 13:57 in reply to "Yes!"
B. Janssen Member since:
2006-10-11

BSDrama: There's great potential in this. This could be the tipping point for Linux. Being honest, as a fairly new *NIX user I can tell you guys that most people don't want to be bothered with the console or, in the case of BSD, with ports.

You, certainly, know that Linspire was already very casual-user friendly before this announcement. AFAIK, they were the first to include a searchable help manual that showed you movies to explain how to do stuff. You certainly don't need to use a terminal if you don't want to.

And although Synaptic is a fairly good option, nothing beats double clicking on an icon to install software.

Unless, of course, you want to install a whole load of apps, do this without user-interaction, remotely or on several machines at the same time. But agreed, for the casual home desktop user this probably is not too bad.

Standardization IS the way to go. This could very well be a historical announcement. I'm stoked.

I fear, you lost me here. How is moving from being based on Debian to being based on Ubuntu -- which itself is based on Debian -- a step up on the standardization ladder?

Reply Parent Score: 1