Linked by John Mills on Tue 13th Feb 2007 21:49 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "The Ubuntu Technical Board has made two technical decisions of which we would like to inform the Ubuntu community. Both of these decisions concern the upcoming 7.04 release of Ubuntu, scheduled for mid-April." Ubuntu 7.04 will not activate binary video drivers by default, essentially meaning nothing will change from the previous releases. The second change is a major blow to the PowerPC architecture and thus owners of Apple PPC hardware: "The PowerPC edition of Ubuntu will be reclassified as unofficial. The PowerPC software itself and supporting infrastructure will continue to be available, and supported by a community team." Translation: Ubuntu PPC can shake hands with the dodo.
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The quest for bling
by TheBadger on Tue 13th Feb 2007 22:55 UTC
TheBadger
Member since:
2005-11-14

It seems to me that Ubuntu went into "shark jump danger mode" from Breezy onwards, with various quality issues surfacing in almost every new release. Perhaps if the developers spent less time trying to emulate pointless desktop special effects shown off by Mac users (or Sun engineers) with no real work to be getting on with, they'd realise that binary-only drivers aren't necessary in making a genuinely decent/innovative desktop experience. (In fact, binary-only drivers often have serious technical issues which would impede user acceptance, even in environments where money is changing hands to have the offending graphics hardware directly supported.)

It might also help if they also stopped introducing half-thought-through breakage in the name of usability, presumably led by some "experts" who think removing most of the features, emptying most of the screen, and swapping the buttons makes for usability. And actually fixing reported bugs would probably improve the user experience more than having spinning desktop cubes and the like.

But I guess the pundits and the punters just love "shiny", so we'll be seeing more of it. Let's hope the installer still works by the time it arrives in force, eh?

Reply Score: 4

RE: The quest for bling
by fretinator on Tue 13th Feb 2007 22:59 in reply to "The quest for bling"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Another sign that Ubuntu has "arrived" is the number of people who slam it. Success of any kind brings this out.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: The quest for bling
by cmost on Wed 14th Feb 2007 00:14 in reply to "The quest for bling"
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

Why do you use Ubuntu again? Or, if you don't use it then why are you responding here? Ubuntu is spending considerable time on "bling" as you put it and on "usability" features (again, as you put it) because that's what gets Linux onto desktops. And obviously whatever they're doing is working because Ubuntu has been ranked number one on Distrowatch for over two years; almost since it's inaugural release. Having to install and maintain a workstation via the command line or by editing cryptic text files may be your cup of tea but most people want their computer to be functional AND fun to use.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: The quest for bling
by TheBadger on Wed 14th Feb 2007 23:42 in reply to "RE: The quest for bling"
TheBadger Member since:
2005-11-14

I distinguish between bling (lots of fading in/out, wobbling, spinning things) and usability. You don't need the former to get lots of the latter. And things like decent control panels are important, and the Ubuntu people have done quite well with them, so I'd like to see more work in that area, but without them doing things like badly patching the printing system (a major source of criticism) or playing "hide the filesystem".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: The quest for bling
by archiesteel on Wed 14th Feb 2007 03:15 in reply to "The quest for bling"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Perhaps if the developers spent less time trying to emulate pointless desktop special effects shown off by Mac users (or Sun engineers) with no real work to be getting on with, they'd realise that binary-only drivers aren't necessary in making a genuinely decent/innovative desktop experience.

I disagree. A hardware-accelerated desktop is *not* pointless. Some of the effects, such as the Expose clone, are *very* useful to a certain type of user (such as me).

As far as the "spinning cube" goes, it's a great way to visualize four different desktops...and it really impresses non-Linux users (I have yet to see anyone being indifferent to it).

Beryl/Compiz have been a great boost for Linux awareness. You might not feel it's important to you, but that doesn't mean it doesn't help Linux as a whole gain more mindshare.

Also, you should realize that the Ubuntu devs are not "spending time" on Beryl/Compiz...the work is done by the Beryl/Compiz devs, Ubuntu is simply benefitting from it. That's how things work in open-source - there's absolutely no guarantee that Beryl/Compiz devs would work on other, less blingy Linux stuff if they weren't working on the hardware-accelerated desktop.

Finally, I'd like to say that it's misleading to suggest that the quality of Ubuntu releases has been going down. In fact, I have to say that in my experience, it's been the other way around (apart from a few problems at the release of Dapper). Edgy is an excellent release, and I'm looking forward to installing Feisty once it's ready!

Edited 2007-02-14 03:16

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: The quest for bling
by sbergman27 on Wed 14th Feb 2007 03:54 in reply to "RE: The quest for bling"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

While I don't think that a 3D accelerated desktop is necessarily "pointless", I have yet to see anything that is useful in one.

Expose clone? Maybe. But does it really require 3D?

It always comes back to the spinning cube... and how it makes virtual desktops clear to stupid people. I think that is questionable.

As it happens, I have about 60 Linux desktop users that I support. Some of them pick up virtual desktops instantly. Others never will... no matter how many spinning cubes you put in front of them.

The spinning cube, more than anything, reminds me of the weapon reload animation in Quake and Doom. Its main function is to artificially slow you down.

The best argument I have ever heard in favor of 3D desktops under Linux is the argument that if Windows goes completely 3D, chip makers will drop the 2D API, leaving us in the lurch, as it were.

Which is a very bad thing for Linux. Because our OSS coverage of 3D chipsets is crap compared to the competition. Even in the case that the manufacturer makes the specs available, as with the Radeon 9200 and below.

And the situation is far worse when they don't.

I, for one, do not welcome our new 3D overlords.

Edited 2007-02-14 03:56

Reply Parent Score: 5