Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Feb 2007 09:58 UTC, submitted by george
Windows Microsoft is keen to stir up enthusiasm for Windows Vista, but when it comes to the 64-bit edition of the recently released operating system, the software giant is sending decidedly mixed messages. Vista is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions, with the latter targeted at owners of recent computers with 64-bit processors. However, customers who purchase the retail version of Vista Home Basic, Home Premium or Business don't have the option of buying the 64-bit version directly. It also seems Microsoft will toughen its anti-piracy policies.
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eivind
Member since:
2005-11-09

"Those are reasons not to use Vista *at all*."

Not before SP1 / kernel 6.1, at least. VERY true.

Reply Parent Score: 1

cyclops Member since:
2006-03-12

Off-topic
=========

Why should SP1 solve *anything*. All a service pack is is a large group of fixes(sic), packages together.

Microsoft have said that SP1 will be out in 8 Months due to this lie.

The reality is Vista is ready for the user somewhere between now---->never, and Microsoft is not the only player Nvidia, AMD, Creative, Apple and a whole host of smaller companies are not ready for Vista, and a lot of products will simply never have good support under Vista or at all.

Thats ignoring the fact that improved(sic) DRM; Trusted computing; WGA etc etc will all be part and parcel of whats included in SP1.

Reply Parent Score: 2

eivind Member since:
2005-11-09

"Why should SP1 solve *anything*. All a service pack is is a large group of fixes(sic), packages together."

Not entirely true. A service pack could be *anything*. Look at XP SP2. Look at what it solved.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Robocoastie Member since:
2005-09-15

I've noticed tremendous speed gains with Vista 64 (though I havn't tried 32bit perhaps the speed gains is vista itself over xp) but I've yet to find software that will actually work. Oh my hardware is just fine but the software is non-existant particularly multimedia ones which 64bit is supposed to be the biggest help for. Divx conversion? No vista yet for that. Games?- won't even run (don't really care about that anymore though as I use my xbox for gaming more now).

But Linux on the other hand not only has all those multimedia programs available in 64bit (and YES there's a tremendous gain using them over 32 bit windows equivalents) but it also can run the complete 32 bit library so that I can run any 32bit software I need. Now why Vista didn't include a complete 32bit library so programs truely can run in "compatibility" mode is beyond me.

Reply Parent Score: 3

n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

But Linux on the other hand not only has all those multimedia programs available in 64bit (and YES there's a tremendous gain using them over 32 bit windows equivalents) but it also can run the complete 32 bit library so that I can run any 32bit software I need. Now why Vista didn't include a complete 32bit library so programs truely can run in "compatibility" mode is beyond me.

This is already built-in. It's called Windows on Windows64 (WoW64). Most 32-bit software should run without issue on 64-bit versions of Windows -- the exception being 32-bit drivers or software that is dependant on 32-bit drivers. Most games, codecs, etc., are not dependant, and compatibility issues are likely either related to how the app was developed (naive checks in the installer or app code for instance), or, in the case of games/video codecs, GPU driver support could also play a role.

The default versions of some apps included with Vista x64 are 32-bit (e.g., Windows Media Player and Internet Explorer) for compatibility with existing plugins and applications. 64-bit versions of these applications are also included of course.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Phloptical Member since:
2006-10-10

Yeah, don't hold your breath for Vista SP1. I have a feeling that, in order to foster more Vista sales, MS is going rush to market some duct-tape and bubble gum hodge-podge of "fixes" and call it a "Service Pack" simply for the sake of getting one out. They know corporate IT departments are scoffing at the idea of upgrading/supporting this pig, and MS know's the main deal breaker for adoption is the release of the inevitable service pack.

I wouldn't expect anything to be fixed or improved from SP1. The real one will be SP2, or later.

Reply Parent Score: 1