Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 25th Feb 2007 21:23 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "A current mania is to exile yourself for a certain period of time into the rival desktop environment, to see how bad (or not) you would feel: a KDE fan would use GNOME, while a GNOME guy would use KDE. I have undertaken the challenge myself, and it wasn't bad at all." More here. Additionally, a Gnome panel apps review.
Thread beginning with comment 216508
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
I took this challenge
by gregk on Sun 25th Feb 2007 22:46 UTC
gregk
Member since:
2006-03-13

I did this myself as a KDE user. I tried to use GNOME for 10 days. I spent way too much time trying how to figure out how to do things. Apparently the super-intuitive way the GNOME is supposed to work wasn't intuitive enough for me. Simple things like showing hidden files in the open/save dialogue (I know, right-click, but how about a tickbox or some other visual cue) and how to get a file tree in Nautilus (yes, a setting in the control panel, why can't it just be an option in the menu where it makes sense to quickly look for it when you are in Nautilus) The point is there are no visual cues to discover these simple things.

It got so bad I quit in three days out of frustration because I had some work to do. To be fair, I probably should try again when I don't have so much to accomplish. I thought having things to do would force me to "use" GNOME. I guess I should do the opposite, try when I have time to play around a bit.

Edited 2007-02-25 22:47

Reply Score: 5

RE: I took this challenge
by Daniel Borgmann on Mon 26th Feb 2007 01:45 in reply to "I took this challenge"
Daniel Borgmann Member since:
2005-07-08

It's just the same the other way around. Just don't use GNOME if you have no reason to, I find these "I'll use xyz for some days to make a point" experiments rather silly to be honest.

Simple things like showing hidden files in the open/save dialogue (I know, right-click, but how about a tickbox or some other visual cue)

Fair enough, personally I wouldn't like to have it exposed in the interface. Part of what intrigues me about GNOME is its visual elegance, sometimes this requires minor trade-offs.

and how to get a file tree in Nautilus (yes, a setting in the control panel, why can't it just be an option in the menu where it makes sense to quickly look for it when you are in Nautilus)

You must be talking about getting a navigational window (because it has and always had a tree by default). It is not true that you have to go to the control panel, you can simply open the file browser from the menu or chose "browse folder" from the context menu. The spatial/navigational split of Nautilus is another thing I love about GNOME, but I can see why it creates so much confusion. Note that recent versions of Nautilus now also have a tree-based list view, another kick-ass feature borrowed from Mac OS Classic:
http://www.gnome.org/~davyd/gnome-2-12/images/nautilus-list.png

I think that GNOME and KDE appeal to different kinds of people at this point. GNOME tends to have its head in the clouds from time to time (i.e. focusing on the big picture and occasionally neglecting the here and now) and incidentally that matches my own personality. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 5