Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 27th Feb 2007 23:57 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless A hacker from Malaysia has used the game-centric PPL programming language for PocketPCs and has created a replacement of the "Today" PPC screen that closely resembles that of the iPhone's. His clone is still under development, although it is already impressive what he was able to do with a few lines of code. He was even able to recreate the iPhone's scrolling effect. Nevertheless, a nice toy.
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I'll give it...
by flanque on Wed 28th Feb 2007 00:27 UTC
flanque
Member since:
2005-12-15

I'll give this, hmm about 48 hours before Apple and their legal eagles start sending cease and decist orders. I'm suprised it hasn't happened already, knowing Apple.

Reply Score: 4

RE: I'll give it...
by Eugenia on Wed 28th Feb 2007 00:37 in reply to "I'll give it..."
Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

The guy has not released anything (yet).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: I'll give it...
by flanque on Wed 28th Feb 2007 00:56 in reply to "RE: I'll give it..."
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

// The guy has not released anything (yet). //

Since when does that ever concern Apple?

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: I'll give it...
by butters on Wed 28th Feb 2007 02:50 in reply to "I'll give it..."
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

This is why software patents suck. Apple has over 200 patents for the iPhone, some of which are simple enough that a hobbyist can implement them in a week using a few pictures of the product and readily available APIs. Patents are intended to protect inventions that are costly to develop but cheap to replicate. At first it seems like this applies perfectly to software. Costly to develop, nearly free to replicate.

But software is covered by copyright, and therefore its creators can explicitly prohibit replication. They can also prevent people from being able to figure out how it works. Why would you need to patent something if you can prevent people from figuring out how it works? Replication involves uncovering intentional obscured details of its operation and implementation from scratch. It's nearly as costly to replicate copyrighted OSS as it is to implement it in the first place, and perhaps more costly to do so for proprietary software. Designing software is the easy part, implementing it is hard, and replicating it might even be harder.

The other day I went to the grocery store, and among other things, I wanted pickles. After initially selecting the usual pickle chips, I thought I'd try the "sandwich stackers." The innovative shape is an improvement for use on sandwiches, I must say. But upon further consideration, I concluded that a square shape to fit a normal slice of bread would be even better. "Butters," someone objects, "you can't cut a 4" square from a cucumber!" Sure I can! I figured it out, and I could probably get a patent. I have zero intention of getting into the pickle business, but when Vlasic makes the same logical leap I did, I could whip out the submarine patent claims. No truly sandwich-sized pickle slices for anyone, because I said so.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: I'll give it...
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 28th Feb 2007 06:56 in reply to "RE: I'll give it..."
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I have zero intention of getting into the pickle business, but when Vlasic makes the same logical leap I did, I could whip out the submarine patent claims. No truly sandwich-sized pickle slices for anyone, because I said so.

Cornichon sauce wants to be free!!!1

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I'll give it...
by butters on Wed 28th Feb 2007 03:18 in reply to "I'll give it..."
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

I feel like ranting some more...

We don't need or want patents anymore. Everybody is now connected. Tangible objects can be produced anywhere and sold anywhere else. Intangible deliverables are even easier to bring to market. The market wants just barely enough suppliers for any product for competition to work, and often even less than that. There's no money to be made in selling something that's already available. You're either first to market, best to market, or searching for a new market. The global marketplace is the ultimate incentive to innovate.

Some suggest that patents are bad for software, but good for other markets such a pharmaceuticals. I disagree. Why would a pharmaceutical company copy a competitor's drug and sell it for less? This would cause a price war that will rapidly drive the price down to near the cost of production and distribution. Pharmaceutical companies don't want to save people's lives and break even, they want get filthy rich. The only way to do this is to be the first or best to market with a useful drug and charge whatever outrageous price the healthcare industry is willing to bear.

Patents are a kludge for a time where it was easier to make money off of other people's ideas than to develop your own. This is no longer the case in any market that I can think of. Down with patents.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: I'll give it...
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 28th Feb 2007 07:08 in reply to "RE: I'll give it..."
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Why would a pharmaceutical company copy a competitor's drug and sell it for less?

That does happen, at least with AIDS medications. Several pharmaceutical companies got themselves some bad press a few years ago when they started trying to crack down on African companies selling unlicensed & less-expensive equivalents of commercial medication for treating AIDS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I'll give it...
by flanque on Wed 28th Feb 2007 07:26 in reply to "RE: I'll give it..."
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

// Why would a pharmaceutical company copy a competitor's drug and sell it for less? //

They're called "generic versions" designed to be identical but the same. In Australia, companies are more or less forced to release the drug formula and molecules to the generic competitors to enhance competition and ensure drugs are affordably made available to those who need them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I'll give it...
by gedmurphy on Wed 28th Feb 2007 08:57 in reply to "I'll give it..."
gedmurphy Member since:
2005-12-23

you can't patent the look and feel of something.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I'll give it...
by phoenix on Wed 28th Feb 2007 18:10 in reply to "I'll give it..."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

This is what shows on the page now:

This Account Has Been Suspended
Please contact the billing/support department as soon as possible.

Either the site has reached it's bandwidth quota, or Apple has already called in the dogs. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I'll give it...
by stestagg on Wed 28th Feb 2007 19:07 in reply to "RE: I'll give it..."
stestagg Member since:
2006-06-03

The rational me says that all the publicity pushed him over the bandwidth limit.

The other side begins to imagine black helicopters and men in skimasks wearing half-eaten fruit logos.

Reply Parent Score: 2