Linked by Shahar Weiss on Thu 1st Mar 2007 18:58 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu I've been an Arch user for roughly 3 years. I'm pretty much familiar with it all - The way it boots, its configuration and its package management. I've also heard a lot of good things about Ubuntu, and wanted to try it for a long time. So, two weeks ago, I took the plunge. These are my findings.
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RE: From Arch to Ubuntu
by sbenitezb on Thu 1st Mar 2007 19:52 UTC
sbenitezb
Member since:
2005-07-22

The upgrades were downloaded, but hardly any of them were installed - A debconf screen was waiting for my input on some package (which I do not recall), which blocked all further upgrades.

I agree this sometimes happen, but did you just apt-get dist-upgrade or did you use Synaptic? I think Synaptic automatically selects a default choice for you for most packages.

A package installation should not be interactive, according to me (and to my previously installed Arch). A valid solution would be using default valuese

The problem is when you have modified some config files and the new package provides different options. What do you do with that? Is hard to make a sensible choice without affecting the user's system. Machines are not good to make decisions.

I Then try printers - In here, the GUI is so basic it is also rendered useless. Not good.

I've stoped using Samba for sharing printers. CUPS IPP is better and standard. You can setup a printer from Windows XP easily with something like 192.168.0.1/printers/YourPrinterName without messing with Samba. You can also access SMB shares without installing and configuring Samba, if you use KDE.

Installing Kubuntu, I've also received Amarok 1.4.3. I tried to add my collection to it, but it failed indexing my collection, due to a bug which was fixed in Amarok 1.4.5. So, I wanted to install Amarok 1.4.5. One of Arch's strengths was the ease of building packages. I wondered how to do the same thing in Ubuntu. The entire thing seems a lot more complex than building an Arch package - There are 3 forms of building a package for Ubuntu, each way consists of writing several files, where the absolute minimum is 2 files (please correct me if I'm wrong here)...

You should have checked http://www.kubuntu.org fo updates. There you would have found a new Amarok release and how to setup apt sources to download and upgrade. No need to build anything. But if you prefer to build from sources, it's as simple as apt-build the package.

Let's say I accidentally deleted a very important file which is used by KDE. A possible solution would be reinstalling KDE altogether to restore the lost files.

You shouldn't be messing around with system files. If you do, then you probably are above the average user and know how to track down the file you deleted with dpkg and then reinstall the package manually.

EDIT: OSNews guys, I think we are past HTML . How about supporting semantic tags?

Edited 2007-03-01 19:53

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: From Arch to Ubuntu
by intangible on Thu 1st Mar 2007 21:17 in reply to "RE: From Arch to Ubuntu"
intangible Member since:
2005-07-06

Actually, even in regular Ubuntu you can connect to samba shares without having to fully install samba; just type in smb://hostname in Nautilus or use "Places->Connect to Server..."

I also agree, IPP is the only way to handle printer sharing these days, though standard Ubuntu will connect to SMB printers quite easily too.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: From Arch to Ubuntu
by chris_dk on Fri 2nd Mar 2007 16:19 in reply to "RE[2]: From Arch to Ubuntu"
chris_dk Member since:
2005-07-12

Yes, you have to use Connect To Server because browsing shares is broken Gnome. That is really lame.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: From Arch to Ubuntu
by brewmastre on Thu 1st Mar 2007 23:06 in reply to "RE: From Arch to Ubuntu"
brewmastre Member since:
2006-08-01

I agree this sometimes happen, but did you just apt-get dist-upgrade or did you use Synaptic? I think Synaptic automatically selects a default choice for you for most packages.

Whenever I do a dist upgrade on Ubuntu I use "sudo update-manager -d" which still causes all of the prompts (i.e. doesn't take defaults)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: From Arch to Ubuntu
by apoclypse on Fri 2nd Mar 2007 00:43 in reply to "RE[2]: From Arch to Ubuntu"
apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

The best way to do an upgrade without prompts is to do it from a terminal (tty1-6) using sudo apt-get dist-upgrade. Better yet use aptitude which handles the dependencies better. I really suggest you DON'T use the graphical tools when you do these things. Using the graphical tools will give you prompts besides, even though apt-get supports it doing an upgrade that may entail upgrading x while you are in it is not a good idea. I know its not really necessary but its an old habit from the mess that was fedora upgrades.

Reply Parent Score: 1