Linked by Shahar Weiss on Thu 1st Mar 2007 18:58 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu I've been an Arch user for roughly 3 years. I'm pretty much familiar with it all - The way it boots, its configuration and its package management. I've also heard a lot of good things about Ubuntu, and wanted to try it for a long time. So, two weeks ago, I took the plunge. These are my findings.
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RE[2]: Wow
by stare on Thu 1st Mar 2007 20:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Wow"
stare
Member since:
2005-07-06

if it supports my linux filesystem

google ext2ifs

or if it allows me to install on anything but the first partition

sure it does.

and allows me to configure multiple SATA disks to be used like one big disk

sure it does, diskmgmt.msc -> dynamic disk

I'm also willing to see how does it manages my memory

in a very efficient manner, with technologies like SuperFetch.

800 bucks for an usable desktop

Actually $100-200, for a _really_ usable desktop, not like one described in the article. [/irony]

Edited 2007-03-01 20:59

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Wow
by MamiyaOtaru on Thu 1st Mar 2007 21:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Wow"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

google ext2ifs

Yeah great, ext2. Or ext3.. without journalling! I used ext2ifs for a while but I got sick of running e2fsck all the time. If it was a little more stable, maybe. I ended up going back to fat32 for crossplatform storage.

usable desktop, not like one described in the article.

Some "power user" not finding things the same as in his distro of the last 3 years doesn't make it unusable. I mean what'd he complain about really? Samba had a lot of options? Upgrade wasn't fire and forget?

Actually $100-200, for a _really_ usable desktop

Paying money for a usable desktop? That'd be OSX then.. ;) I mean Windows can be easier for a new user than Linux for sure, I don't recommend Linux for everyone. Not like I can recommend Windows either though, from what I've seen average Joe is quite succeptible to malware on Windows and doesn't know what to do about it. Oh well, Linux is easy enough for me, and Windows easy enough for you ;)

Edited 2007-03-01 21:34

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Wow
by butters on Fri 2nd Mar 2007 00:18 in reply to "RE[2]: Wow"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

ext2ifs

This is like saying it's acceptable for Linux to support any Windows filesystems, so long as it's FAT32. The Linux community bent over backwards to reverse engineer NTFS with no low-level documentation or cooperation from Microsoft. The least Microsoft can do is take our clean, open source implementations of ext3 and reiserfs and implement a basic Windows port. Or do they expect the Linux community to do this, too?

diskmgmt.msc -> dynamic disk

What the hell is that? I haven't been using Windows very much lately, but I wouldn't even know where to begin from this explanation. Is this a registry key? Is a *.msc a kind of configuration utility? Not easy enough for a Linux user to figure out.

in a very efficient manner, with technologies like SuperFetch.

You mean in a more aggressive and wasteful manner? There's nothing efficient about SuperFetch. Anticipatory paging is only a good idea if you have a small amount of memory, lots of disk bandwidth, and no more than (3*NCPUS)/2 threads simultaneously awake on average. This is an unusual situation for a modern desktop system. Otherwise you're wasting precious disk bandwidth and evicting possibly useful pages from memory when it isn't necessary, all to try (possibly unsuccessfully) to keep the current thread runnable when there's other threads that also want to run. It's a tradeoff that could end up improving or decreasing performance, not an efficiency improvement by any means.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Wow
by BluenoseJake on Fri 2nd Mar 2007 00:32 in reply to "RE[3]: Wow"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

diskmgmt.msc -> dynamic disk

"What the hell is that? I haven't been using Windows very much lately, but I wouldn't even know where to begin from this explanation. Is this a registry key? Is a *.msc a kind of configuration utility? Not easy enough for a Linux user to figure out. "

Perhaps he didn't explain it well, but it is not much different than the standard response to a question about Linux either.

All he is saying is open the disk management management console, by typing diskmgmt.msc, in the run box and then convert your disk drive to a dynamic disk. this allows you to set up raid, JBODs, you name it, just like LVM. An easier way to do it is just right click on my computer, choose manage, and then click on disk management. either way, it's easy to do in windows.

Edited for sloppy typing

Edited 2007-03-02 00:33

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Wow
by archiesteel on Fri 2nd Mar 2007 04:34 in reply to "RE[2]: Wow"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Actually $100-200, for a _really_ usable desktop, not like one described in the article.

The article is from someone moving from one Linux distribution to another, not from someone moving from Windows. The fact is that when you use a distro, you get used to its way of doing things and its quirks.

I moved from Mandriva to Ubuntu, and at first there were things I was used to doing on Mandriva that confused me on Ubuntu - however, that doesn't mean the desktop is not usable (never mind the fact that the article's author is an advanced user).

Personally, Kubuntu's printer interface (i.e. KDE's) is very usable, and easy to find.

So unless you have something of value to contribute about either Arch Linux or Ubuntu, I suggest that you abstain from bringing Windows into it. Doing so would be off-topic (not to mention trolling).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Wow
by stare on Fri 2nd Mar 2007 13:33 in reply to "RE[3]: Wow"
stare Member since:
2005-07-06

The fact is that when you use a distro, you get used to its way of doing things and its quirks

Things mentioned are not quirks, but a serious lack of polish.

Personally, Kubuntu's printer interface (i.e. KDE's) is very usable, and easy to find.

Agreed, that's why I prefer KDE for my Linux boxes, overall it seems more flexible to power user.

So unless you have something of value to contribute about either Arch Linux or Ubuntu, I suggest that you abstain from bringing Windows into it. Doing so would be off-topic (not to mention trolling).

Yeah, I got it. When Linux/MacOS users flood Windows topics with their "insightful" opinions about how superior their OS'es are -- it's ok and they got modded up quickly. But just mentioning Vista in Linux thread is offtopic, trolling and crime.

Reply Parent Score: 1