Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 3rd Mar 2007 21:47 UTC
Linux "Almost a year ago the Linux WLAN developers announced the switch to a new WLAN subsystem. Today the new system finally found its way into the mm kernel tree of Andrew Morton. In May and April 2006 it became clear that the devicescape WLAN stack will be the future base for the Linux WLAN drivers. The aim was to overcome the current situation of having several different subsystems for different drivers and to create a common, well documented subsystem. The new stack will feature a reworked driver for Broadcom bcm43xx drivers as well as a Ralink rt2x00 driver. And, as already mentioned, Intel's ipw3945 driver will be implemented without the need for a proprietary deamon."
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What about the current stack?
by Invincible Cow on Sun 4th Mar 2007 15:24 UTC
Invincible Cow
Member since:
2006-06-24

Since you can't have two network stacks at once, then we will have a lot a drivers for the old network stack that can't be used with the new one, right? So what's the point of this?

Reply Score: 1

h times nue equals e Member since:
2006-01-21

From the article:

It was made clear that there is still some work to do and that the driver is not ready for inclusion - yet. However, it was also made clear that it is not too far away, as realistic aims kernels 2.6.23 or 2.6.24 were mentioned.

The mm tree is kind of a testbed for new developments, that will probably find its way to the mainline kernel, so that driver developers can accommodate to them and more bugfixing/testing can be done.

Porting open source drivers over to the new environment until this stack hits the mainline should be a quite straight forward process (giving, that this development has been announced for quite some time and - again citing the article - most newer developments have focused already on the new stack) and wrt binary-loop drivers: Well, nobody ever guaranteed binary compability, right?

Reply Parent Score: 2

PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

Why can't you have two network stacks at once?? I'm not saying you'd want to, but I also don't see the technical limitation and it is an intelligent thing to do in the interim before drivers get ported over to the new stack.

Reply Parent Score: 1

abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

Since you can't have two network stacks at once, then we will have a lot a drivers for the old network stack that can't be used with the new one, right? So what's the point of this?

Which old stack? There is more than one other one out there. I guess you're talking about the in-tree stack, but I think most people now have wireless cards that don't use a driver that uses the in-tree stack. There are a lot of different wireless implementations floating around right now and by the time devicescape is in the mainline kernel it will probably support everything that that the in-tree stack supports plus a lot of previously out-of-tree drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 2