Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Mar 2007 22:27 UTC
Java "Although the .NET vs. Java war is basically over for control of the Windows desktop, where .NET is sure to become the managed language of choice for new Windows desktop applications, there is a new battle brewing. That battle is for the Linux desktop. Now that Java has been open sourced under the GPL, even the most strict of the 'free software only' distributions can start bundling it and integrating it into their Linux distributions out of the box."
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Who said the war was over?
by redbarchetta on Thu 8th Mar 2007 21:13 UTC
redbarchetta
Member since:
2005-11-14

Almost every application we use at work is written in Java, either Swing or SWT. And these are third party applications not just things we write here... in fact I don't think we use a single application written in .NET... and this is a huge government contract with multiple venders... so what is this about Java having lost the battle for the Windows desktop???

Reply Score: 1

RE: Who said the war was over?
by kaiwai on Thu 8th Mar 2007 21:42 in reply to "Who said the war was over?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think the assumptions is based on the fact that .NET will be available on all Windows platforms, and .NET framework will eventually be the framework of choice for Windows applications.

The assumption is rather optimistic given how long it took for the original win16 to win32 migration - add to that, what are the benefits; if they want multi-platform, there is Java - so how can Microsoft justify re-writes of applications (or atleast partial) given the next to no tangiable improvement.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Lambda Member since:
2006-07-28

I think the assumptions is based on the fact that .NET will be available on all Windows platforms, and .NET framework will eventually be the framework of choice for Windows applications.

Yeah, that's why .NET is/will be the platform for the vast majority of windows programming.

The assumption is rather optimistic given how long it took for the original win16 to win32 migration

It wasn't that long. Everybody wanted to get away from win16 as soon as possible.

add to that, what are the benefits; if they want multi-platform, there is Java

Most windows developers don't care about multiplatform.

so how can Microsoft justify re-writes of applications (or atleast partial) given the next to no tangiable improvement

They don't re-write unless there is a good enough benefit. Visual Studio is a perfect example. Gradually, parts of it are rewritten in managed code.

Reply Parent Score: 2