Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 14th Mar 2007 22:10 UTC
Gnome "Today, the GNOME Project celebrates the release of GNOME 2.18, the latest version of the popular, multi-platform Free desktop environment." The GNOME 2.18 start page has all the details, such as release notes, download locations, and screenshots.
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RE[3]: release
by Daniel Borgmann on Wed 14th Mar 2007 23:21 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: release"
Daniel Borgmann
Member since:
2005-07-08

It's right there in the places menu (one to the right of Applications on the desktop) and it has a very clear name. What would you suggest? I think some users are just so conditioned to the idea that CD burning is provided by a third party application that they don't even notice the integrated solution if it stares them right at their face. That cannot necessarily be fixed by the software, so why not tell them about it when they ask? Of course K3B is always a safe bet, but there is no reason to tell them to install K3B if all they want is to burn an image file.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: release
by Eugenia on Wed 14th Mar 2007 23:27 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

i think that nautilus-burn's window needs a bit of text (small size, italics) right under the name in the blue banner, saying "drag n drop some files here to burn". It is not fool-proof obvious for some people what to do.

Edited 2007-03-14 23:27

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: release
by Hiev on Wed 14th Mar 2007 23:31 in reply to "RE[4]: release"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

Exactly.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: release
by diegocg on Wed 14th Mar 2007 23:38 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
diegocg Member since:
2005-07-08

I think some users are just so conditioned to the idea that CD burning is provided by a third party application that they don't even notice the integrated solution if it stares them right at their face.


Right, that maybe the problem - which may befixable which just adding a "CD Burner" icon in the apps menu that opens the cd burning folder. But. "Usability" is about people being able to use software, so if they can't find what they want despite of being there...there's a usability problem IMO.

For example, you may argue that the "places -> cd burner" menu is "usable". But why should users think of the cd burner as a "place"? And what happens when you've a CD inserted?: You've the cd menu entry, AND the burner entry. IOW, there're *two* menu entries for the same physical thing. And that apparently confuses users.

And then, there's the nautilus burning interface: A "virtual" directory. Sure, you and me know that you should copy & paste the files there. There's only a not-clickable "burn" button. Nothing informs users that they're inside of a "burning app". It shouldn't be to hard to put a small text there: "Drop here the files that you want to burn" or something.

And then, when they move around the directories and they want to return to the CD burning app...how to do it? You can do it, but it's not easy for novice users.


IOW, I think that the nautilus burning interface is just not intuitive. It's very brave to try unify the cd burning app with the file manager, but unless you make things easier, users are not going to use it.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: release
by SlackerJack on Thu 15th Mar 2007 02:28 in reply to "RE[4]: release"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Well when you put a blank CD in it prompts you then opens up nautilus. I think people are going way to far with this, it's not like XP intergrated burning is obvious to.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: release
by abraxas on Thu 15th Mar 2007 14:29 in reply to "RE[4]: release"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

And then, there's the nautilus burning interface: A "virtual" directory. Sure, you and me know that you should copy & paste the files there. There's only a not-clickable "burn" button. Nothing informs users that they're inside of a "burning app". It shouldn't be to hard to put a small text there: "Drop here the files that you want to burn" or something.

The nautilus burning interface is very similar to the XP interface. So if people are having problems with Gnome then they most certainly have problems with XP. I don't think it is too confusing considering there is a big "write to disk" button in the window. That being said I prefer using Brasero. I am used to having another program to burn CD/DVDs with.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: release
by pcdoctor on Fri 16th Mar 2007 20:59 in reply to "RE[4]: release"
pcdoctor Member since:
2007-03-05

I'm pretty much an idiot when it comes to working my Ubuntu/Linux drive...
so I asked on the LinuxForums.org site about a suitable burner for Ubu,
and installed whatever it was they recommended (couldn't even call its name now!)
Took one look at its decidedly UN-intuitive interface,
couldn't figure out what the hell to do,
and forgot about it, and haven't returned!

Nowadays, when I want to burn something, I fire up the XP drive, and use NERO, which I know and understand.

WHEN will the Linux ppl come around to the reality that 90% of us idiot computer users are NOT geek-types?
We want/demand INTUITIVE, not dorky!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: release
by Doc Pain on Thu 15th Mar 2007 03:20 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"I think some users are just so conditioned to the idea that CD burning is provided by a third party application that they don't even notice the integrated solution if it stares them right at their face."

These basic tools belong to Linux and BSD distributions for some years now. The users should get aware of the fact that a modern OS contains such tools by default.

"That cannot necessarily be fixed by the software, so why not tell them about it when they ask?"

Maybe it's too complicated for them to understand? "But I have to install something if I want to [insert desired action here]!" seems to be a common principle.

"Of course K3B is always a safe bet, but there is no reason to tell them to install K3B if all they want is to burn an image file."

For FreeBSD, burncd would be the first choice, connected to a drop icon in Gnome, or simply called via a xterm session.

Reply Parent Score: 2