Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 14th Mar 2007 22:10 UTC
Gnome "Today, the GNOME Project celebrates the release of GNOME 2.18, the latest version of the popular, multi-platform Free desktop environment." The GNOME 2.18 start page has all the details, such as release notes, download locations, and screenshots.
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RE[2]: release
by kaiwai on Thu 15th Mar 2007 01:44 UTC in reply to "RE: release"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

For me, nautilus-burn really doesn't do it for me because you can't brn iso images - sure, I drop to command line and do it manually, but at the same time, I would have thought that along with packet based writing (treating a cd/dvd like any other storage), image writing would be quite important.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: release
by thebluesgnr on Thu 15th Mar 2007 02:01 in reply to "RE[2]: release"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

Simply right click an ISO image and select "Write to CD".

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: release
by sbergman27 on Thu 15th Mar 2007 02:31 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
Simply right click an ISO image and select "Write to CD".
"""

I just want to add that this has been true for quite a number of releases.

Some people, who disagree with the level of simplification of the Gnome UI, want to see more options added back.

But this user missed a very basic one in the current forest of menu options.

I think it is obvious that we need at least three levels of interface, selectable by the user:

1. Novice
2. Intermediate
3. Advanced

The current strategy of simplifying the primary interface and stuffing all the rest into the gconf-editor is suboptimal.

The user should be able to start out with a simple, reduced option interface. And then graduate to higher levels as their proficiency increases.

I'm not confining my recommendation to Gnome, BTW. Gnome, KDE, and XFCE are all in a position to implement it.

First one that does will be a winner.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: release
by Lobotomik on Thu 15th Mar 2007 07:56 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03

Or drag and drop the iso file to the cd burner place, and you will be asked if you want to write that as a disk with just one file that would be the iso file, or rather create a disk with the contents of the iso file.

It is a tricky question, but writing CDs is tricky; Gnome cannot assume you want to create a disk from the iso image, though that would be the most frequent choice by far. Maybe the burn button could directly create the disk from ISO asking no questions, while the file-burn command in the pull down menu could pop up a window offering more choice (as happens in many apps with the print button and the file-print option).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: release
by kaiwai on Thu 15th Mar 2007 08:51 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Thank you for the correction; I don't know why I was marked down given it was a genuine inquiry; the way I interpret 'write to cd' I assumed it meant just a straight copy to the cd of the file rather than the actualy image itself being used to create the cd.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: release
by GhePeU on Thu 15th Mar 2007 10:17 in reply to "RE[2]: release"
GhePeU Member since:
2005-07-06

For me, nautilus-burn really doesn't do it for me because you can't brn iso images - sure, I drop to command line and do it manually, but at the same time, I would have thought that along with packet based writing (treating a cd/dvd like any other storage), image writing would be quite important.

I don't know what Gnome release you're using, but here (2.16) when I double click on a iso file nautilus-cd-burner starts.

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/5691/cdburnervm2.gif

Edited 2007-03-15 10:33

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: release
by pievets on Thu 15th Mar 2007 16:16 in reply to "RE[3]: release"
pievets Member since:
2007-03-15

I consider nautilus-burn not usable for the following two reasons.

1.) you cannot write to multi-session CDs.

2.) you cannot erase CD-RWs.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: release
by dsmogor on Thu 15th Mar 2007 13:19 in reply to "RE[2]: release"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

Packet writing is another sore point in linux.
This is so useful and convenient, I don't get why it's being so overlooked.

Anybody here brave enough to submit support for rw udf mounts to udev/volume manager?

Reply Parent Score: 1