Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 17th Mar 2007 00:26 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu During my 8 years of Linux on and off usage I have tried more distros than I have chocolate bars. Each one of my previous encounters meant that I had to spend at least 2 days configuring before I have a desktop that I was somewhat comfortable with. With Ubuntu Feisty Fawn's latest test beta --for the first time ever-- this was not the case. I was up and running with all the niceties I wanted within 2 hours.
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My experience with Feisty
by chrono13 on Sat 17th Mar 2007 01:17 UTC
chrono13
Member since:
2006-10-25

~15 Minute easy install. Add/Remove sort by popularity, add Nvidia and some players and other popular software
On-attempt-to-play install of most codecs (automagic MP3 and most video support without fuss). With my extra software, some video players/codecs didn't work. I clicked the help icon and followed the easy instructions. Everything just worked.
3d Effects simple as a light switch. I was greedy and wanted beryl. Three lines because I was lazy. I probably could have figured a way to do it entirely GUI.

So, since AIXGL is in by default, and restricted software is visible/easier to install. I had a wonderfully set up system in little bit a half-hour. With some really excellent "the most popular" software (Amarok, K3b, Firefox, Open Office, VLC, MPlayer, Gxine, wine, etc).

Then the test... updates. Alpha/Beta updates on an already configured system? I've been through several updates now, including three xorgs, two kernel, and other major updates and nothing has broken. Not bad for alpha software. I was expecting breakage because the packages were still being updated and changed. Nope. Everything works.

Meanwhile, in Windows this week, I'm running Regmon, Filemon and some other testing, bug catching and monitoring software to find a nasty freeze (I suspect it is the LCD apps I'm running). Already took care of a blue screen that hit last week (video codecs).

For those very familiar with Linux *and* Windows many have found Linux easier for quite some time.

Feisty I believe will tip that scale for the novice. Want to walk your mom over the phone through XP install, activation, antivirus, firewall, software installs, configurations, drivers... Keeping in mind it was a virus or spyware that nuked her system the last two times?
Or... Ubuntu Feisty with a less than half hour setup depending on what she needs?

I can honestly say that for me, Linux has become better than Windows.

Easier to use, set up, and certainly more enjoyable.

Reply Score: 5

RE: My experience with Feisty
by Bending Unit on Sat 17th Mar 2007 10:33 in reply to "My experience with Feisty"
Bending Unit Member since:
2005-07-06

And what will you do when she needs to troubleshoot and repair Linux? Teach her the UNIX command line? How to calculate and add new modelines in xorg.conf? RTFM?

Linux may be easy as long as things just work but when things break or you need to do something that isn't covered by GUI tools the user is totally lost. And getting help with a highly complex system with such few users is not going to easy.

Convert people to Linux and you will probably be their computer tech for a very long time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

And Windows is "really" easy to fix when it gets broken.....

what was your point ?
apart from flamebait.





Edit as my E key did not seem to work. ;)

Edited 2007-03-17 11:03

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: My experience with Feisty
by rtfa on Sat 17th Mar 2007 11:12 in reply to "RE: My experience with Feisty"
rtfa Member since:
2006-02-27

I've never has to mod xorg.conf for my screens.

What do you do to fix Windows - reinstall anything from a driver or application of the whole OS to fix it. You should stop quoting hearsay and learn about other systems. Some systems don't "just stop working" like Windows system do.

"Convert people to Windows and you will be their computer tech for a very long time." is the true statement hence the large Windows support teams in large organisations. I am forever fixing windows systems for family and friends.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: My experience with Feisty
by lemur2 on Sat 17th Mar 2007 11:20 in reply to "RE: My experience with Feisty"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

{And what will you do when she needs to troubleshoot and repair Linux? Teach her the UNIX command line? How to calculate and add new modelines in xorg.conf? RTFM?

Linux may be easy as long as things just work but when things break or you need to do something that isn't covered by GUI tools the user is totally lost. And getting help with a highly complex system with such few users is not going to easy.

Convert people to Linux and you will probably be their computer tech for a very long time.}


Firstly, I would probably tell such a user to install an easy-to-use Linux in the first place. One built for newbies.

Then I would point them here:
http://www.pclinuxonline.com/wiki/HomePage

... and if they were having a problem with hardware setup, I would direct them here:
http://www.pclinuxonline.com/wiki/PclosControlCenter
... and then here ...
http://www.pclinuxonline.com/wiki/AddUpgradeHardware

... and if the problem was setting up X, I would point them here:
http://www.pclinuxonline.com/wiki/ChangeResolution

... and have them go nowhere near a command line.

If they were using SuSe, I would direct them to the GUI control-panel equivalent for video settings, which is part of yast.

If they had a Kubuntu system, well that isn't quite as friendly as many systems, as it really isn't for newbies. Nevertheless, I would direct them to this page:
http://www.kubuntu.org/docs/kquickguide/C/ch03s07.html
... then here ...
http://www.kubuntu.org/docs/kquickguide/C/ch03s07.html#sect-display

There is, I'm sure, a similar arrangement for Ubuntu.

Then they could still fix their video hardware problem without using a GUI.

It is a myth that you must use then command-line in Linux. It is less of a myth for Ubuntu systems than it is for some others, but it is still a myth.

Reply Parent Score: 1