Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 17th Mar 2007 00:26 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu During my 8 years of Linux on and off usage I have tried more distros than I have chocolate bars. Each one of my previous encounters meant that I had to spend at least 2 days configuring before I have a desktop that I was somewhat comfortable with. With Ubuntu Feisty Fawn's latest test beta --for the first time ever-- this was not the case. I was up and running with all the niceties I wanted within 2 hours.
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melkor
Member since:
2006-12-16

Eh? Excuse me? I've probably used Linux a whole lot more than you, and probably know a lot more about it. So, don't talk about my 'special needs'.

An operating system has to do what I need it to do. If it can't, then it's not suitable - period. At the moment, Linux continues to fragment. Whilst this is good, and offers choice to the user, the downside is that it doesn't encourage software vendors to port their software to Linux.

I'm not going to blame Canon, etc. I've done my bit, I've asked for them (previously) to support GNU/Linux. I can ask, but that doesn't mean I'll get what I want. If it makes you feel a bit better, an engineer at Canon Australia told me that they're looking to natively support Canon cameras in the near future for Linux. Adobe? I'd love Adobe to port Photoshop, and I honestly don't think that it'd be that hard for them. If they can get it running on OS X, then they can it with Linux as well. Unfortunately, I can't make Adobe port it. You could have a million emails go to Adobe, requesting that Photoshop be ported, in the end, they won't do it unless they feel that they have to. Photoshop is their baby, and they'll do what they please. Until Linux has an equally powerful, and usable Photo editing/imaging application, there'll be no pressure on Adobe to port. Plain and simple.

I can from the GIMP to Photoshop btw. I don't mind the GIMP, but it's simply not intuitive, and it doesn't let me do the things that I need to do, as a photographer. Plain and simple. Photoshop does. If Adobe ports to Linux, and the other pieces of software that I rely on are ported, I'd switch back in an instant. I prefer GNU/Linux, I prefer the GPL. Early in 2006 I needed to make a distinction - stay with Linux and be hampered as a photographer, or move back to Windows (or OS X) and grow as a photographer. I chose the latter.

You're not telling me something I don't know (drivers, etc), I've used Linux long enough and extensively enough to know what I'm doing. I'm not some newbie troll who has no idea what he's talking about.

Anyways, to me, Ubuntu doesn't give me choice, real choice. If it offered the 2 major desktop environments, I'd consider it. Until then, I can't honestly recommend Ubuntu. If it pleases you, 3 of my friends have tried Ubuntu and all have been unimpressed, with an attitude of "what's all the fuss about?". One much prefers Mandrive, another Fedora, and another Mepis.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 2

Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

Melkor, my husband is a prosumer photographer (Canon 5D) and he as well can't use Linux to do what he needs to do as a photographer (samples: http://www.geocities.com/jbqueru/ ). There is no secret there.

However, this is how it is, and I suggest you use Windows or OSX to do your job. Use the best tool for the job, and for your line of work, that's Win or OSX.

Use Linux if you just want a desktop aside from your work.

Edited 2007-03-17 06:20

Reply Parent Score: 1

Kokopelli Member since:
2005-07-06

If it offered the 2 major desktop environments, I'd consider it.

Ubuntu (and Debian) rely on the repositories more than providing options during install. It makes for a trimmer install and empowers the user to make their choices as they use the system.

1) the desktop installed initially or "sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop" if you use the server install.
2) sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop
3) sudo apt-get install xubuntu-desktop
4) sudo apt-get install fluxbox
5) sudo apt-get install fvwm
etc....

You are not some newbie troll, but anyone who has been at OSNews for more than 2 days has heard the argument about missing Photoshop. It has been beat to death. If you need Photoshop use OS X or Windows. Linux is not a fit for every user's needs. Nor is Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

Adobe won't ever release their apps on Linux, at least I don't believe so.

Why? It's because they know hardly anyone would buy it. Many poeople may tell Adobe they would want to USE Photoshop on Linux, but how many people would actually BUY Photoshop if it was released for Linux? People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'. Adobe know this... so does every other large software co. that won't release Linux versions.

Businesses won't pay for it... they already purchased Macs for their design departments or have the Windows versions. I don't believe there could be very many 'businesses' for Adobe to target on Linux, certainly not enough to make it worth the development costs.

Edited 2007-03-17 10:57

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Adobe on Linux
by ubit on Sat 17th Mar 2007 11:06 in reply to "RE[5]: Ubuntu is missing too much stuff..."
ubit Member since:
2006-09-08

http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?13@@.3bc1d4af/0

"Chris Cox:
Is the time approaching when Linux has standards for fonts, color management, printing, etc.?

Is the time approaching when Linux has standard APIs beyond POSIX? (in other words: Linux is just the kernel, it's all the other stuff that makes it useful. But all that other stuff varies from distribution to distribution.)

Is the time approaching when Linux has standards for a GUI? (anything based on X WIndows does not qualify... Been there, bought the T-shirt, still got the books, but ain't goin back)

Is the time approaching when Linux has real desktop applications and not just command line apps, one-off ports and server products?

And most importantly: is the time approaching when Linux desktop users are willing to pay for commercial software?

Let me know when you have a serious answer.
"

I'm not sure about the argument that people don't pay for Linux, considering Red Hat/Oracle(proprietary)/Suse/IBM(proprietary). Honestly it seems to me like a red herring. I know most students already pirate Photoshop anyways.

Edited 2007-03-17 11:08

Reply Parent Score: 3

rtfa Member since:
2006-02-27

"People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'."

this is a Microsoft windows issue - The only pirated software is Windows Based software done by Windows users who don't want to pay for Photoshop etc. The biggest music pirating is done by Windows users.

Stop spreading blatent lies about Linux users, the FREE part means freedom and it happens in most case that the software is free in cost as well.

I know loads of Windows users using the "free" versions of software such as AVG so who are the freeloaders then?????

Reply Parent Score: 1

udi7 Member since:
2007-03-18

People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'.

Hahaha, are you really that naive? People who use Windows do it all the time. I can assure you that the majority of the software installed in PCs with Windows in the world is pirated. And that "People who use Linux" thing is really hilarious. I think people who currently use Linux don't need Photoshop. Otherwise they wouldn't be Linux users, would they? So, we can say that most designers are Windows or OSX users. Some of them would be willing to switch to Linux if Adobe ported Photoshop. If those designers are honest people who choose to buy original software (even thought getting a cracked version is the easiest thing in the world) they will keep doing it in Linux. Honesty is not determined by the OS you use, is it?

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

{People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'.}

<sarcasm>
You know, you are 100% correct.

After all, as an example, Linux Genuine Advantage ...
http://www.linuxgenuineadvantage.org/
... has already been cracked!
http://www.alienos.com/articles/2007/02/02/linux-genuine-advantage-...

</sarcasm>

{ Adobe know this... so does every other large software co. that won't release Linux versions. }

So what about the large software companies that do release Linux versions of proprietary applications? Including, BTW, the largest such company, IBM?

Seriously, it won't be long before Adobe lose any opportunity to establish a market for Photoshop on the Linux platform, as Krita in KOffice 2.0 under KDE4 (which will be available on Windows as well as Linux) catches up then passes it by.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krita
http://www.koffice.org/krita/

Edited 2007-03-18 10:16

Reply Parent Score: 2

ngaio Member since:
2005-10-06

I am a serious photographer (with exhibited work) so I cannot help but comment on the claim that GNU Linux is not useful for serious photographers. Professional photographic workflow software exists that runs on GNU Linux, e.g. Bibble Pro, but there are also others. I use Ubuntu to take RAW files off my camera, categorize by date and immediately backup to multiple hard drives (using python scripts I have written myself), Bibble Pro to convert the RAW files into 16 bit TIFFs, and then I use Photoshop CS2 to convert those TIFFs to jpegs in a variety of sizes. I run Photoshop in VMware or under dual boot. I agree that Photoshop is currently superior to the Gimp for photographers for a number of compelling reasons, but I would say they are related to features rather than the user interface. The UI of both programs have their pluses and minuses.

I am also a student currently doing my MA, and here too while I use Ubuntu all the time (I'm using it now), there is specialized software that only runs under Windows (or Mac) that makes the life of a student far easier. Endnote is one of these programs (bibliographic management). While I have high hopes for Zotero, Endnote is a great time saver, again for a number of compelling reasons. Dragon NaturallySpeaking (voice recognition, Windows only) can also be extremely useful for producing papers. Fortunately VMware player does the trick in this situation, meaning I can run Ubuntu while at the same time having access to Endnote and NaturallySpeaking.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Re: Ubuntu and photographers
by melkor on Tue 20th Mar 2007 02:07 in reply to "Re: Ubuntu and photographers"
melkor Member since:
2006-12-16

I'm not going to fork out more money for VMWare. And I've tried Bibble Pro, in all honesty, the quality of the files aren't that great, and it's UI is shocking.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 1

Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

I can from the GIMP to Photoshop btw. I don't mind the GIMP, but it's simply not intuitive, and it doesn't let me do the things that I need to do, as a photographer. Plain and simple. Photoshop does. If Adobe ports to Linux, and the other pieces of software that I rely on are ported, I'd switch back in an instant. I prefer GNU/Linux, I prefer the GPL. Early in 2006 I needed to make a distinction - stay with Linux and be hampered as a photographer, or move back to Windows (or OS X) and grow as a photographer. I chose the latter.

Ever heard about Cinepaint? It is the second image editor used not only by professional photographers but also movie studios after Adobe Photoshop.
http://www.cinepaint.org/

Edited 2007-03-17 21:33

Reply Parent Score: 2

melkor Member since:
2006-12-16

Yes, I've heard of Cinepaint. Photoshop CS2 works just fine for me. I'm not saying Cinepaint is bad, I'm simply saying that I'm financially committed to Photoshop and I'm happy with the way that it works, and what I can do with my images.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 1

melkor Member since:
2006-12-16

tsk tsk. I'm quite competent at using GNU/Linux thank you very much.

I didn't say that Ubuntu sucked for everyone, I said that it doesn't suit my needs and that Linux in general doesn't work for me because of a variety of current issues (and that I hoped that those issues would get solved, so that I could return to using GNU/Linux).

Photoshop CS2 is not arcane, I'd wager a solid bet than more people use Photoshop than use GNU/Linux ;-) Other software such as Canon's DPP, or Capture One Pro are lesser used, although a lot of people have Canon digital cameras these days (DPP is also used with Canon digital compacts, not just DSLRs).

I personally detest Microsoft Windows for a variety of reasons, so please don't make me out to be a Windows troll, which I am most certainly not. If you want to be a Linux troll, go for it, I need a good laugh from time to time :-)

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 1